Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Indians, Alcohol, and the Roads to Taos and Santa Fe by William E. Unrau (review)

Indians, Alcohol, and the Roads to Taos and Santa Fe by William E. Unrau (review) JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Spring 2014) Indians, Alcohol, and the Roads to Taos and Santa Fe. By William E. Unrau. (Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 2013. Pp. 192. Cloth, $29.95.) Reviewed by M. J. Morgan As Emeritus Distinguished Professor of History at Wichita State University and author or coauthor of ten books about Indians, William E. Unrau is a consummate scholar in an important field. His earlier study, White Man's Wicked Water: The Alcohol Trade and Prohibition in Indian Country, 1802­1892 (Lawrence, KS, 1996), is the precursor to his new work on alcohol distribution in the Trans-Mississippi and Mountain West. Earlier, Unrau argued that federal policies and private capital merged as a force in Indian dispossession, and that the cession of Indian lands was both a result of an increased dependency on alcohol and the means by which Indian alcoholism was exacerbated. Unrau's gift is the careful probing of complex and concomitant sociopolitical events; he establishes big-picture processes for readers. In the new book, he focuses on ``how it came to pass that distilled alcohol . . . was in fact easily obtainable by so many resident and transient Indians'' (2). Thus, his narrative concerns interlocking processes: http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Indians, Alcohol, and the Roads to Taos and Santa Fe by William E. Unrau (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 34 (1) – Jan 28, 2014

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-pennsylvania-press/indians-alcohol-and-the-roads-to-taos-and-santa-fe-by-william-e-unrau-JecGx220xM
Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Spring 2014) Indians, Alcohol, and the Roads to Taos and Santa Fe. By William E. Unrau. (Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 2013. Pp. 192. Cloth, $29.95.) Reviewed by M. J. Morgan As Emeritus Distinguished Professor of History at Wichita State University and author or coauthor of ten books about Indians, William E. Unrau is a consummate scholar in an important field. His earlier study, White Man's Wicked Water: The Alcohol Trade and Prohibition in Indian Country, 1802­1892 (Lawrence, KS, 1996), is the precursor to his new work on alcohol distribution in the Trans-Mississippi and Mountain West. Earlier, Unrau argued that federal policies and private capital merged as a force in Indian dispossession, and that the cession of Indian lands was both a result of an increased dependency on alcohol and the means by which Indian alcoholism was exacerbated. Unrau's gift is the careful probing of complex and concomitant sociopolitical events; he establishes big-picture processes for readers. In the new book, he focuses on ``how it came to pass that distilled alcohol . . . was in fact easily obtainable by so many resident and transient Indians'' (2). Thus, his narrative concerns interlocking processes:

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Jan 28, 2014

There are no references for this article.