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In Hock: Pawning in America from Independence through the Great Depression (review)

In Hock: Pawning in America from Independence through the Great Depression (review) REVIEWS ism, but Arians, too, worried that their religion suffered from too much mind, not enough heart. Their theological differences were not insubstantial, but one misses something of the similarities. In making Bentley a ``one-man faction'' and extending his narrative only nominally past 1805, Ruffin forgoes the opportunity to connect the dots to the religious rationalism of the 1810s and beyond. But such criticism is really a minor quibble. Ruffin accomplishes something significant: He wanders into the potential wilderness of theological controversy and makes the topic both interesting and relevant. More importantly, he demonstrates that the content of belief matters. In paying close attention to the fine-grained distinctions among religious ideas, Ruffin takes long strides toward integrating that content into its deserved place amidst the political narratives of the early republic. Na than S. R ive s received his PhD from Brandeis University in 2011 and is an adjunct instructor of history at Weber State University. His dissertation is entitled ``A Nation Under God: The Politics of Moral Reasoning in New England, 1776­1850.'' In Hock: Pawning in America from Independence through the Great Depression. By Wendy Woloson. (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2010. Pp. 233. Cloth, $35.00.) Reviewed http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

In Hock: Pawning in America from Independence through the Great Depression (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 31 (3) – Aug 11, 2011

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University of Pennsylvania Press
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Copyright © University of Pennsylvania Press
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1553-0620
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Abstract

REVIEWS ism, but Arians, too, worried that their religion suffered from too much mind, not enough heart. Their theological differences were not insubstantial, but one misses something of the similarities. In making Bentley a ``one-man faction'' and extending his narrative only nominally past 1805, Ruffin forgoes the opportunity to connect the dots to the religious rationalism of the 1810s and beyond. But such criticism is really a minor quibble. Ruffin accomplishes something significant: He wanders into the potential wilderness of theological controversy and makes the topic both interesting and relevant. More importantly, he demonstrates that the content of belief matters. In paying close attention to the fine-grained distinctions among religious ideas, Ruffin takes long strides toward integrating that content into its deserved place amidst the political narratives of the early republic. Na than S. R ive s received his PhD from Brandeis University in 2011 and is an adjunct instructor of history at Weber State University. His dissertation is entitled ``A Nation Under God: The Politics of Moral Reasoning in New England, 1776­1850.'' In Hock: Pawning in America from Independence through the Great Depression. By Wendy Woloson. (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2010. Pp. 233. Cloth, $35.00.) Reviewed

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Aug 11, 2011

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