<i>With Sails Whitening Every Sea: Mariners and the Making of an American Maritime Empire</i> by Brian Rouleau (review)

With Sails Whitening Every Sea: Mariners and the Making of an American Maritime Empire by... REVIEWS � 425 and there is not a single footnote reference to the U.S. State Department archives or the British Foreign Office papers. One will find a much greater breadth of primary sources in Edward Jervey and C. Harold Huber’s 1980 article from the Journal of Negro History. Despite these criticisms, the book will be an enjoyable read for a gen- eral audience, and scholars might find the book serviceable if they need a reference for the revolt itself or for a portion of the diplomatic fallout. College instructors may also find use for the book. It tells a great story about the largest successful slave revolt in American history, and its rela- tive silence on the larger implications allows them to be incorporated into class discussions or written assignments. But those looking for the definitive work on the Creole Affair will have to wait. Michael Schoeppner is assistant professor of history at the Univer- sity of Maine–Farmington. He has just finished his first book, Regulating Moral Contagion, on the Negro Seamen Acts, and is currently conduct- ing research for a book on the Dred Scott decision. With Sails Whitening Every Sea: Mariners and the Making of an American http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

<i>With Sails Whitening Every Sea: Mariners and the Making of an American Maritime Empire</i> by Brian Rouleau (review)

Journal of the Early Republic, Volume 36 (2) – Jun 14, 2016

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620

Abstract

REVIEWS � 425 and there is not a single footnote reference to the U.S. State Department archives or the British Foreign Office papers. One will find a much greater breadth of primary sources in Edward Jervey and C. Harold Huber’s 1980 article from the Journal of Negro History. Despite these criticisms, the book will be an enjoyable read for a gen- eral audience, and scholars might find the book serviceable if they need a reference for the revolt itself or for a portion of the diplomatic fallout. College instructors may also find use for the book. It tells a great story about the largest successful slave revolt in American history, and its rela- tive silence on the larger implications allows them to be incorporated into class discussions or written assignments. But those looking for the definitive work on the Creole Affair will have to wait. Michael Schoeppner is assistant professor of history at the Univer- sity of Maine–Farmington. He has just finished his first book, Regulating Moral Contagion, on the Negro Seamen Acts, and is currently conduct- ing research for a book on the Dred Scott decision. With Sails Whitening Every Sea: Mariners and the Making of an American

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Jun 14, 2016

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