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Unpopular Sovereignty: Mormons and the Federal Management of Early Utah Territory by Brent M. Rogers (review)

Unpopular Sovereignty: Mormons and the Federal Management of Early Utah Territory by Brent M.... REVIEWS � 183 triumphalists” (167). Were they really exemplary of the planter elite at large, or only of an eccentric strain within it? Karp’s case for their pre- eminence is strong in the Tyler years, but much weaker in the 1850s. His cast of leading players includes a disquieting number of known cranks, including Henry Wise and especially Duff Green. Green was a fantastic character, possessed of gargantuan self-importance and a mind that teemed with lurid conspiracies and giant schemes. He is hard to take entirely seriously, yet Karp presents him as the most influential shaper of proslavery globalism, its “philosopher, propagandist, indomitable master spirit” (129). The Civil War presents both the fruition of Karp’s thesis and its cru- cial test. Karp’s exposition of proslavery globalism helps explain why its adherents embraced secession. However, his argument that the clause in the failed Crittenden compromise protecting slavery in future territories south of the Missouri line mattered less for its promise of more slave states than because it “affirmed the possibility that the foreign policy of slavery, in one form or another, might still have a future in U.S. national politics” is the weakest in the whole book (230). An independent http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Unpopular Sovereignty: Mormons and the Federal Management of Early Utah Territory by Brent M. Rogers (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 39 (1) – Feb 28, 2019

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620

Abstract

REVIEWS � 183 triumphalists” (167). Were they really exemplary of the planter elite at large, or only of an eccentric strain within it? Karp’s case for their pre- eminence is strong in the Tyler years, but much weaker in the 1850s. His cast of leading players includes a disquieting number of known cranks, including Henry Wise and especially Duff Green. Green was a fantastic character, possessed of gargantuan self-importance and a mind that teemed with lurid conspiracies and giant schemes. He is hard to take entirely seriously, yet Karp presents him as the most influential shaper of proslavery globalism, its “philosopher, propagandist, indomitable master spirit” (129). The Civil War presents both the fruition of Karp’s thesis and its cru- cial test. Karp’s exposition of proslavery globalism helps explain why its adherents embraced secession. However, his argument that the clause in the failed Crittenden compromise protecting slavery in future territories south of the Missouri line mattered less for its promise of more slave states than because it “affirmed the possibility that the foreign policy of slavery, in one form or another, might still have a future in U.S. national politics” is the weakest in the whole book (230). An independent

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Feb 28, 2019

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