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Tyrannicide: Forging an American Law of Slavery in Revolutionary South Carolina and Massachusetts by Emily Blanck (review)

Tyrannicide: Forging an American Law of Slavery in Revolutionary South Carolina and Massachusetts... REVIEWS � 405 Hartog’s most ambitious claims are a bit too strained, the core of his argument holds but now with Federalists as part of a larger cultural movement rather than at the vanguard. Beyond any of these particulars, Patriotism and Piety succeeds in reminding historians that religion mattered in early American political debates. More than just reactionaries left to reconstruct their spiritual world in the wake of political transformation, religious thinkers helped craft that transformation in profound ways. Just like with the Federalists he examined, Den Hartog’s contribution is found as much in the form as in the content. Benjamin E. Park is an assistant professor of history at Sam Houston State University. He is completing a book manuscript on competing cul- tivations of nationalism between the Revolution and the Nullification crisis. Tyrannicide: Forging an American Law of Slavery in Revolutionary South Carolina and Massachusetts. By Emily Blanck. (Athens: Univer- sity of Georgia Press, 2014. Pp. 217. Cloth, $49.95.) Reviewed by James J. Gigantino II Emily Blanck uses a little known interstate dispute to discuss some sweeping issues in the legal history of slavery and the larger historiogra- phy of the nation’s founding. Tyrannicide tells the tale of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Tyrannicide: Forging an American Law of Slavery in Revolutionary South Carolina and Massachusetts by Emily Blanck (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 36 (2) – Jun 14, 2016

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620

Abstract

REVIEWS � 405 Hartog’s most ambitious claims are a bit too strained, the core of his argument holds but now with Federalists as part of a larger cultural movement rather than at the vanguard. Beyond any of these particulars, Patriotism and Piety succeeds in reminding historians that religion mattered in early American political debates. More than just reactionaries left to reconstruct their spiritual world in the wake of political transformation, religious thinkers helped craft that transformation in profound ways. Just like with the Federalists he examined, Den Hartog’s contribution is found as much in the form as in the content. Benjamin E. Park is an assistant professor of history at Sam Houston State University. He is completing a book manuscript on competing cul- tivations of nationalism between the Revolution and the Nullification crisis. Tyrannicide: Forging an American Law of Slavery in Revolutionary South Carolina and Massachusetts. By Emily Blanck. (Athens: Univer- sity of Georgia Press, 2014. Pp. 217. Cloth, $49.95.) Reviewed by James J. Gigantino II Emily Blanck uses a little known interstate dispute to discuss some sweeping issues in the legal history of slavery and the larger historiogra- phy of the nation’s founding. Tyrannicide tells the tale of

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Jun 14, 2016

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