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The Rabbi's Atheist Daughter: Ernestine Rose, International Feminist Pioneer by Bonnie S. Anderson (review)

The Rabbi's Atheist Daughter: Ernestine Rose, International Feminist Pioneer by Bonnie S.... REVIEWS � 197 The burdens of childbearing, parenting, and domestic labor fell heavily on women. Strom does an excellent job weaving together these lives, identifying crucial points of comparison that illuminate broader patterns in the his- tory of self-making. As she demonstrates, the limited avenues open to women for achieving some degree of “self-reliance” all involved public appeal through commercial avenues—the press, the platform, and the stage. The history of “fame and fortune” in the nineteenth century, then, is a story about the gendered avenues to independence. These are fascinating figures with “melodramatic” lives, but even as Strom shows them fighting for every new opportunity or falling back from the public eye, fame itself is rarely treated as an object of analysis. There are many questions that need further analysis: What is the rela- tionship between “fame” and making a living as a platform speaker? Does fame have a history, not only of the different avenues individuals traveled, but also different commercial mechanisms, representational frameworks, and hierarchies of value? How did the different avenues and questions through which these individuals became public figures shape the terms as well as the larger resonance of their renown? How were these figures http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

The Rabbi's Atheist Daughter: Ernestine Rose, International Feminist Pioneer by Bonnie S. Anderson (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 39 (1) – Feb 28, 2019

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620

Abstract

REVIEWS � 197 The burdens of childbearing, parenting, and domestic labor fell heavily on women. Strom does an excellent job weaving together these lives, identifying crucial points of comparison that illuminate broader patterns in the his- tory of self-making. As she demonstrates, the limited avenues open to women for achieving some degree of “self-reliance” all involved public appeal through commercial avenues—the press, the platform, and the stage. The history of “fame and fortune” in the nineteenth century, then, is a story about the gendered avenues to independence. These are fascinating figures with “melodramatic” lives, but even as Strom shows them fighting for every new opportunity or falling back from the public eye, fame itself is rarely treated as an object of analysis. There are many questions that need further analysis: What is the rela- tionship between “fame” and making a living as a platform speaker? Does fame have a history, not only of the different avenues individuals traveled, but also different commercial mechanisms, representational frameworks, and hierarchies of value? How did the different avenues and questions through which these individuals became public figures shape the terms as well as the larger resonance of their renown? How were these figures

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Feb 28, 2019

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