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The American School of Empire by Edward Larkin (review)

The American School of Empire by Edward Larkin (review) REVIEWS � 167 this time. This fact, coupled with the need to import tea from the Carib- bean and European ports, reoriented the republic’s commercial networks in a way that helped build the nineteenth-century global economy described by Sven Beckert and others. It may have also led to tea’s decline and coffee’s success as American trade become more focused on Latin America. At the end of the book, one is left wondering about such developments and how tea lost its central place in American parlors, shops, and statehouses. Both Merritt and Bullock hopefully will inspire further research on such changes and the intertwined histories of trade, consumer, and political revolutions. Erika Rappaport is professor of history at the University of Califor- nia and is the author of A Thirst for Empire: How Tea Shaped the Modern World (Princeton, NJ, 2017). The American School of Empire. By Edward Larkin. (Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2016. Pp. 151. Cloth, $49.99.) Reviewed by Len von Morze “The United States was itself an empire before it was a nation,” Bernard DeVoto wrote in The Course of Empire (1952), “though it was first a people who had made a society” (391). Edward Larkin’s concisely http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

The American School of Empire by Edward Larkin (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 39 (1) – Feb 28, 2019

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620

Abstract

REVIEWS � 167 this time. This fact, coupled with the need to import tea from the Carib- bean and European ports, reoriented the republic’s commercial networks in a way that helped build the nineteenth-century global economy described by Sven Beckert and others. It may have also led to tea’s decline and coffee’s success as American trade become more focused on Latin America. At the end of the book, one is left wondering about such developments and how tea lost its central place in American parlors, shops, and statehouses. Both Merritt and Bullock hopefully will inspire further research on such changes and the intertwined histories of trade, consumer, and political revolutions. Erika Rappaport is professor of history at the University of Califor- nia and is the author of A Thirst for Empire: How Tea Shaped the Modern World (Princeton, NJ, 2017). The American School of Empire. By Edward Larkin. (Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2016. Pp. 151. Cloth, $49.99.) Reviewed by Len von Morze “The United States was itself an empire before it was a nation,” Bernard DeVoto wrote in The Course of Empire (1952), “though it was first a people who had made a society” (391). Edward Larkin’s concisely

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Feb 28, 2019

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