Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

Tea Sets and Tyranny: The Politics of Politeness in Early America by Steven C. Bullock, and: The Trouble with Tea: The Politics of Consumption in the Eighteenth-Century Global Economy by Jane T. Merritt (review)

Tea Sets and Tyranny: The Politics of Politeness in Early America by Steven C. Bullock, and: The... REVIEWS � 163 own. Each year, Witherspoon lectured upperclassmen on moral philoso- phy, theology, and public speaking. A significant fraction of these scrib- bling devotees went on to become college presidents themselves. Many more served in high public office (one, James Madison, is widely regarded as the Father of the Constitution). In other words, scores of America’s leaders acquired their most extensive acquaintance with the latest European thought via an uncompromising Calvinist from Scotland. Mailer has written an important work of intellectual history. Like so many volumes published in the Omohundro Institute series, Mailer’s tome is lavishly documented and beautifully illustrated. Potential readers should be aware that the book is as much about eighteenth- century Protestant thought, especially eighteenth-century Presbyterian thought, as it is a biography of Witherspoon. Nonetheless, this nuanced account of a devout clergyman’s experience in eighteenth-century public life reminds us, as Spencer McBride has done, that American religion and American politics have rarely been separated. Chris Beneke is professor of history at Bentley University. Tea Sets and Tyranny: The Politics of Politeness in Early America. By Steven C. Bullock. (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2017. Pp. 304. Cloth, $45.00.) The Trouble with Tea: The Politics of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Tea Sets and Tyranny: The Politics of Politeness in Early America by Steven C. Bullock, and: The Trouble with Tea: The Politics of Consumption in the Eighteenth-Century Global Economy by Jane T. Merritt (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 39 (1) – Feb 28, 2019

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-pennsylvania-press/i-tea-sets-and-tyranny-the-politics-of-politeness-in-early-america-i-bEGXozUvhR
Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620

Abstract

REVIEWS � 163 own. Each year, Witherspoon lectured upperclassmen on moral philoso- phy, theology, and public speaking. A significant fraction of these scrib- bling devotees went on to become college presidents themselves. Many more served in high public office (one, James Madison, is widely regarded as the Father of the Constitution). In other words, scores of America’s leaders acquired their most extensive acquaintance with the latest European thought via an uncompromising Calvinist from Scotland. Mailer has written an important work of intellectual history. Like so many volumes published in the Omohundro Institute series, Mailer’s tome is lavishly documented and beautifully illustrated. Potential readers should be aware that the book is as much about eighteenth- century Protestant thought, especially eighteenth-century Presbyterian thought, as it is a biography of Witherspoon. Nonetheless, this nuanced account of a devout clergyman’s experience in eighteenth-century public life reminds us, as Spencer McBride has done, that American religion and American politics have rarely been separated. Chris Beneke is professor of history at Bentley University. Tea Sets and Tyranny: The Politics of Politeness in Early America. By Steven C. Bullock. (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2017. Pp. 304. Cloth, $45.00.) The Trouble with Tea: The Politics of

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Feb 28, 2019

There are no references for this article.