Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Securing the West: Politics, Public Lands, and the Fate of the Old Republic, 1785–1850 by John R. Van Atta (review)

Securing the West: Politics, Public Lands, and the Fate of the Old Republic, 1785–1850 by John... 330 � JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Summer 2015) maintained that dissenting ideas, even when false, are profitable for the political community. Martin notes the similarity here with John Stuart Mill’s famous libertarian notions, but he adds that while Mill’s ‘‘theory exist[ed] in a liberal tension with a genuine democratic impulse,’’ the notions of these American writers went hand in hand with a radical democratic perspective (179). Wortman, for instance, went so far as to theorize a ‘‘dissentient public culture, complete with the norms and prac- tices that would make dissent an integrated as well as an integral part of democratic politics’’ (165). A short review cannot do justice to the numerous historical insights offered by Martin. To be sure, allusions to the 1999 ‘‘Battle of Seattle,’’ ‘‘White House press secretary Ari Fleischer’s post-9/11 declaration that we all must ‘watch what [we] say,’ ’’ George W. Bush’s ability to ‘‘launch and maintain an increasingly unpopular war without serious financial and military problems,’’ the contemporary need for a ‘‘Corporation for Public Dissent,’’ the manipulation by elites of the Tea Party movement, the ‘‘Obama administration’s heavy-handed response to the Wikileaks publications,’’ and the way in which the Occupy Wall Street protests http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Securing the West: Politics, Public Lands, and the Fate of the Old Republic, 1785–1850 by John R. Van Atta (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 35 (2) – Apr 29, 2015

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-pennsylvania-press/i-securing-the-west-politics-public-lands-and-the-fate-of-the-old-SU3zXAnjGG
Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620

Abstract

330 � JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Summer 2015) maintained that dissenting ideas, even when false, are profitable for the political community. Martin notes the similarity here with John Stuart Mill’s famous libertarian notions, but he adds that while Mill’s ‘‘theory exist[ed] in a liberal tension with a genuine democratic impulse,’’ the notions of these American writers went hand in hand with a radical democratic perspective (179). Wortman, for instance, went so far as to theorize a ‘‘dissentient public culture, complete with the norms and prac- tices that would make dissent an integrated as well as an integral part of democratic politics’’ (165). A short review cannot do justice to the numerous historical insights offered by Martin. To be sure, allusions to the 1999 ‘‘Battle of Seattle,’’ ‘‘White House press secretary Ari Fleischer’s post-9/11 declaration that we all must ‘watch what [we] say,’ ’’ George W. Bush’s ability to ‘‘launch and maintain an increasingly unpopular war without serious financial and military problems,’’ the contemporary need for a ‘‘Corporation for Public Dissent,’’ the manipulation by elites of the Tea Party movement, the ‘‘Obama administration’s heavy-handed response to the Wikileaks publications,’’ and the way in which the Occupy Wall Street protests

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Apr 29, 2015

There are no references for this article.