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Horace Holley: Transylvania University and the Making of Liberal Education in the Early American Republic by James P. Cousins (review)

Horace Holley: Transylvania University and the Making of Liberal Education in the Early American... REVIEWS � 175 theoretical influences that Gunn discusses in his introduction—studies by Diana Taylor, Joseph Roach, Walter Mignolo, and Gilles Deleuze and Fe ´lix Guattari, among others—often obscure, rather than clarify, the arguments advanced in his later chapters. In a similar vein, readers with little tolerance for jargon and convoluted syntax will, at times, find Gunn’s prose needlessly impenetrable. Last, all but undiscussed in Ethnology and Empire is the extensive labor of Native Americans them- selves in the project of ethnolinguistics, often in collaboration with the figures Gunn details, and sometimes at odds. Indians participated exten- sively in the collection and publication of vocabularies, grammars, and phrasebooks. In an edition of Sketches of Ancient History of the Six Nations, for example, David Cusick appended a list of words in two Haudenosaunee languages, sharing in the practice of comparative philol- ogy that Gunn characterizes as a “major topic” of his book (7). This omission seems a result of scope rather than ignorance, since Gunn, in his epilogue on Sarah Winnemucca and elsewhere, appeals thoughtfully to indigenous subjects and demonstrates a thorough grasp of the ethical imperatives of scholarship aligned with Native Studies. Nonetheless, attention to this aspect of Gunn’s larger http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Horace Holley: Transylvania University and the Making of Liberal Education in the Early American Republic by James P. Cousins (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 39 (1) – Feb 28, 2019

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620

Abstract

REVIEWS � 175 theoretical influences that Gunn discusses in his introduction—studies by Diana Taylor, Joseph Roach, Walter Mignolo, and Gilles Deleuze and Fe ´lix Guattari, among others—often obscure, rather than clarify, the arguments advanced in his later chapters. In a similar vein, readers with little tolerance for jargon and convoluted syntax will, at times, find Gunn’s prose needlessly impenetrable. Last, all but undiscussed in Ethnology and Empire is the extensive labor of Native Americans them- selves in the project of ethnolinguistics, often in collaboration with the figures Gunn details, and sometimes at odds. Indians participated exten- sively in the collection and publication of vocabularies, grammars, and phrasebooks. In an edition of Sketches of Ancient History of the Six Nations, for example, David Cusick appended a list of words in two Haudenosaunee languages, sharing in the practice of comparative philol- ogy that Gunn characterizes as a “major topic” of his book (7). This omission seems a result of scope rather than ignorance, since Gunn, in his epilogue on Sarah Winnemucca and elsewhere, appeals thoughtfully to indigenous subjects and demonstrates a thorough grasp of the ethical imperatives of scholarship aligned with Native Studies. Nonetheless, attention to this aspect of Gunn’s larger

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Feb 28, 2019

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