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Founding Friendships: Friendships between Men and Women in the Early American Republic by Cassandra Good (review)

Founding Friendships: Friendships between Men and Women in the Early American Republic by... R EVIEWS EDITED BY SEAN P. HARVEY AND L UCIA McMAHON Founding Friendships: Friendships between Men and Women in the Early American Republic. By Cassandra Good. (New York: Oxford University Press, 2015. Pp. 289. Cloth, $34.95.) Reviewed by C. Dallett Hemphill Cassandra Good begins and ends her book with references to the movie When Harry Met Sally (1989) and its seemingly age-old proposition that ‘‘men and women can’t be friends because the sex part always gets in the way.’’ This was a belief held among elites in the early republic as in our own day. And yet Good finds that many succeeded in building male– female friendships, and that these relationships were important and ful- filling for all involved. In her introduction, Good defines what she means by friendships between men and women and the ways in which this type of relationship has a history. She then gives in-depth examples of three such friendships in the first chapter, before turning to an analysis of their cultural con- texts. In five central chapters, she explains how novel and advice writers had little to say about male–female friendships other than that they were risky; compares this lack of treatment with the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Founding Friendships: Friendships between Men and Women in the Early American Republic by Cassandra Good (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 36 (2) – Jun 14, 2016

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620

Abstract

R EVIEWS EDITED BY SEAN P. HARVEY AND L UCIA McMAHON Founding Friendships: Friendships between Men and Women in the Early American Republic. By Cassandra Good. (New York: Oxford University Press, 2015. Pp. 289. Cloth, $34.95.) Reviewed by C. Dallett Hemphill Cassandra Good begins and ends her book with references to the movie When Harry Met Sally (1989) and its seemingly age-old proposition that ‘‘men and women can’t be friends because the sex part always gets in the way.’’ This was a belief held among elites in the early republic as in our own day. And yet Good finds that many succeeded in building male– female friendships, and that these relationships were important and ful- filling for all involved. In her introduction, Good defines what she means by friendships between men and women and the ways in which this type of relationship has a history. She then gives in-depth examples of three such friendships in the first chapter, before turning to an analysis of their cultural con- texts. In five central chapters, she explains how novel and advice writers had little to say about male–female friendships other than that they were risky; compares this lack of treatment with the

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Jun 14, 2016

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