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Fortune, Fame & Desire: Promoting the Self in the Long Nineteenth Century by Sharon Hartman Strom (review)

Fortune, Fame & Desire: Promoting the Self in the Long Nineteenth Century by Sharon Hartman Strom... REVIEWS � 195 Fortune, Fame & Desire: Promoting the Self in the Long Nineteenth Century. By Sharon Hartman Strom. (New York: Rowman & Littlefield, 2016. Pp. 288. Cloth, $85.00.) Reviewed by Sara Lampert In Chapter 5 of Fortune, Fame & Desire: Promoting the Self in the Long Nineteenth Century, Sharon Hartman Strom asks her readers to reflect on the “sturdy lad” of Ralph Waldo Emerson’s 1841 essay “Self- Reliance” and to consider Harriet Wilson, an African American writer, entrepreneur, and Spiritualist lecturer, as “both a congruent and disrup- tive example . . . of what a self-reliant in the mid-nineteenth century could be” (149). This tension is the central focus of Fortune, Fame & Desire, an examination of self-making and self-reliance in the long nine- teenth century. Fortune, Fame & Desire weaves together over a dozen biographies to capture the different spheres of opportunity for nineteenth-century individuals to fashion themselves and the questions through which these figures engaged the public. Many of these individuals “lived on the pre- carious edge of middle-class prosperity”—and also respectability—for all or much of their lives (167). This is, in effect, a study of outliers. Out- casts from white middle-class Protestantism, they cultivated ties http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Fortune, Fame & Desire: Promoting the Self in the Long Nineteenth Century by Sharon Hartman Strom (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 39 (1) – Feb 28, 2019

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620

Abstract

REVIEWS � 195 Fortune, Fame & Desire: Promoting the Self in the Long Nineteenth Century. By Sharon Hartman Strom. (New York: Rowman & Littlefield, 2016. Pp. 288. Cloth, $85.00.) Reviewed by Sara Lampert In Chapter 5 of Fortune, Fame & Desire: Promoting the Self in the Long Nineteenth Century, Sharon Hartman Strom asks her readers to reflect on the “sturdy lad” of Ralph Waldo Emerson’s 1841 essay “Self- Reliance” and to consider Harriet Wilson, an African American writer, entrepreneur, and Spiritualist lecturer, as “both a congruent and disrup- tive example . . . of what a self-reliant in the mid-nineteenth century could be” (149). This tension is the central focus of Fortune, Fame & Desire, an examination of self-making and self-reliance in the long nine- teenth century. Fortune, Fame & Desire weaves together over a dozen biographies to capture the different spheres of opportunity for nineteenth-century individuals to fashion themselves and the questions through which these figures engaged the public. Many of these individuals “lived on the pre- carious edge of middle-class prosperity”—and also respectability—for all or much of their lives (167). This is, in effect, a study of outliers. Out- casts from white middle-class Protestantism, they cultivated ties

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Feb 28, 2019

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