Blackface Nation: Race, Reform, and Identity in American Popular Music, 1812–1925 by Brian Roberts (review)

Blackface Nation: Race, Reform, and Identity in American Popular Music, 1812–1925 by Brian... REVIEWS � 385 Egerton and Paquette say little about the possibility that the affair was an episode grounded primarily—and perhaps exclusively—in white paranoia and fear of racial violence. By their account, “no white notable in South Carolina in 1822 . . . doubted the existence of an insurrection- ary plot”; they debated only its extent and scope (xviii). The editors themselves unequivocally state their belief in the existence of a planned uprising in 1822, expressing their “considered judgment that the Vesey plot was one of the most sophisticated acts of collective slave resistance in the history of the United States” (xv). While that contention avoids some of the scholarly controversy surrounding the Vesey affair, Egerton and Paquette are right to emphasize that the conspiracy and the evidence produced in its aftermath offer an unparalleled window into the politics and attitudes surrounding racial slavery in the nineteenth-century U.S. and Atlantic world. For the most part, however, they allow the evidence they have collected and edited to speak for itself. As an increasing number and variety of primary sources are digitized and made available virtually, this kind of thorough and careful documen- tary editing has become more important than ever. The http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Blackface Nation: Race, Reform, and Identity in American Popular Music, 1812–1925 by Brian Roberts (review)

Journal of the Early Republic, Volume 39 (2) – May 21, 2019

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-pennsylvania-press/i-blackface-nation-race-reform-and-identity-in-american-popular-music-kZ1CAg0bCN
Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620

Abstract

REVIEWS � 385 Egerton and Paquette say little about the possibility that the affair was an episode grounded primarily—and perhaps exclusively—in white paranoia and fear of racial violence. By their account, “no white notable in South Carolina in 1822 . . . doubted the existence of an insurrection- ary plot”; they debated only its extent and scope (xviii). The editors themselves unequivocally state their belief in the existence of a planned uprising in 1822, expressing their “considered judgment that the Vesey plot was one of the most sophisticated acts of collective slave resistance in the history of the United States” (xv). While that contention avoids some of the scholarly controversy surrounding the Vesey affair, Egerton and Paquette are right to emphasize that the conspiracy and the evidence produced in its aftermath offer an unparalleled window into the politics and attitudes surrounding racial slavery in the nineteenth-century U.S. and Atlantic world. For the most part, however, they allow the evidence they have collected and edited to speak for itself. As an increasing number and variety of primary sources are digitized and made available virtually, this kind of thorough and careful documen- tary editing has become more important than ever. The

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: May 21, 2019

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off