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Archives of Labor: Working-Class Women and Literary Culture in the Antebellum United States by Lori Merish (review)

Archives of Labor: Working-Class Women and Literary Culture in the Antebellum United States by... 200 � JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Spring 2019) remained an outsider despite her close friendships with Paulina Wright Davis and Susan B. Anthony. Her atheist stance perhaps more than anything contributed to her sense of alienation. In 1852, Rose noted that she had “cut herself lose from ‘religion,’ ” adding poignantly that “she knew what it had cost her” (15). The rest of her life, she found herself “muting” her free-thought atheism to fit in, having to stand by without comment as, for example, the Women’s National Loyal League endorsed the United States as a “Christian Republic” in the spring of 1863 (73, 121). Anderson goes so far as to suggest that this was part of what prompted Rose’s return to England, where she found in her later life “a congenial community of non-believers” (148). In her careful exploration of a woman’s-rights pio- neer, an internationalist, and an atheist, Anderson offers new insights not only into the reform experience but also Rose’s individual journey, one occasionally at odds with the communities to which she belonged. Bonnie Laughlin -Schultz is an associate professor at Eastern Illi- nois University. She is the author of The Tie That Bound Us: The http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Archives of Labor: Working-Class Women and Literary Culture in the Antebellum United States by Lori Merish (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 39 (1) – Feb 28, 2019

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620

Abstract

200 � JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Spring 2019) remained an outsider despite her close friendships with Paulina Wright Davis and Susan B. Anthony. Her atheist stance perhaps more than anything contributed to her sense of alienation. In 1852, Rose noted that she had “cut herself lose from ‘religion,’ ” adding poignantly that “she knew what it had cost her” (15). The rest of her life, she found herself “muting” her free-thought atheism to fit in, having to stand by without comment as, for example, the Women’s National Loyal League endorsed the United States as a “Christian Republic” in the spring of 1863 (73, 121). Anderson goes so far as to suggest that this was part of what prompted Rose’s return to England, where she found in her later life “a congenial community of non-believers” (148). In her careful exploration of a woman’s-rights pio- neer, an internationalist, and an atheist, Anderson offers new insights not only into the reform experience but also Rose’s individual journey, one occasionally at odds with the communities to which she belonged. Bonnie Laughlin -Schultz is an associate professor at Eastern Illi- nois University. She is the author of The Tie That Bound Us: The

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Feb 28, 2019

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