Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

An American Genocide: The United States and the California Indian Catastrophe, 1846–1873 by Benjamin Madley (review)

An American Genocide: The United States and the California Indian Catastrophe, 1846–1873 by... REVIEWS � 195 slave family structures in Fairfax, whereas those enslaved in Georgetown were better protected from separations by large plantations and the profitability of rice. While many of these essays work well individually, they often fail to speak to each other as a whole. Readers will gain a strong sense of the variety of enslaved communities existing across the Atlantic world and beyond, yet Part 2 insists on the use of the singular enslaved community. A sense of chronology is perhaps inevitably lost when an edited book is structured thematically. Although gender is raised as a theme in some of the book’s chapters, there is nothing about the history of the lives of enslaved women in the historiographical section of the introduction, and, frustratingly, the only female historian of slavery listed in the introduc- tion’s endnotes is Stephanie Camp for her co-edited work with Ed Baptist: New Studies in the History of American Slavery (Athens, GA, 2006). Minimizing the significance of the history of enslaved women inevitably limits this book’s overall value. The introduction also failed to engage with the methodological issues facing historians of slavery, and some of the new ways in which historians are seeking to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

An American Genocide: The United States and the California Indian Catastrophe, 1846–1873 by Benjamin Madley (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 38 (1) – Mar 3, 2018

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-pennsylvania-press/i-an-american-genocide-the-united-states-and-the-california-indian-6ZzJxAg3Gi
Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620

Abstract

REVIEWS � 195 slave family structures in Fairfax, whereas those enslaved in Georgetown were better protected from separations by large plantations and the profitability of rice. While many of these essays work well individually, they often fail to speak to each other as a whole. Readers will gain a strong sense of the variety of enslaved communities existing across the Atlantic world and beyond, yet Part 2 insists on the use of the singular enslaved community. A sense of chronology is perhaps inevitably lost when an edited book is structured thematically. Although gender is raised as a theme in some of the book’s chapters, there is nothing about the history of the lives of enslaved women in the historiographical section of the introduction, and, frustratingly, the only female historian of slavery listed in the introduc- tion’s endnotes is Stephanie Camp for her co-edited work with Ed Baptist: New Studies in the History of American Slavery (Athens, GA, 2006). Minimizing the significance of the history of enslaved women inevitably limits this book’s overall value. The introduction also failed to engage with the methodological issues facing historians of slavery, and some of the new ways in which historians are seeking to

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Mar 3, 2018

There are no references for this article.