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American Sanctuary: Mutiny, Martyrdom, and National Identity in the Age of Revolution by A. Roger Ekirch (review)

American Sanctuary: Mutiny, Martyrdom, and National Identity in the Age of Revolution by A. Roger... 356 � JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Summer 2019) their political context but that slavery as an institution affected and con- strained the nation’s constitutional order in innumerable ways. Even in cases like Barron, where slavery was textually absent, the influence of slavery proved remarkably present, forcing the predicament Marshall faced and framing the legal judgments he delivered. While Mercer might have rendered these connections to slavery more fully and pointedly, his valuable book nevertheless helps us to better comprehend the founda- tions of American liberty by revealing how the peculiar institution not only restricted the distribution of rights but bounded their development and conceptualization. Franklin Sammons is a PhD candidate at University of California– Berkeley and the 2018–2019 Advisory Council Fellow at the McNeil Center for Early American Studies. His dissertation chronicles the Yazoo land sales to examine the relationships between borderlands, law, and political economy. American Sanctuary: Mutiny, Martyrdom, and National Identity in the Age of Revolution.ByA. Roger Ekirch.(New York: Pantheon Books, 2017. Pp. 320. Cloth, $30.00.) Reviewed by Terri Diane Halperin In American Sanctuary, A. Roger Ekirch tells the riveting story of mutiny, murder, escape, and retribution in its full detail. He connects the fate of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

American Sanctuary: Mutiny, Martyrdom, and National Identity in the Age of Revolution by A. Roger Ekirch (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 39 (2) – May 21, 2019

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620

Abstract

356 � JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Summer 2019) their political context but that slavery as an institution affected and con- strained the nation’s constitutional order in innumerable ways. Even in cases like Barron, where slavery was textually absent, the influence of slavery proved remarkably present, forcing the predicament Marshall faced and framing the legal judgments he delivered. While Mercer might have rendered these connections to slavery more fully and pointedly, his valuable book nevertheless helps us to better comprehend the founda- tions of American liberty by revealing how the peculiar institution not only restricted the distribution of rights but bounded their development and conceptualization. Franklin Sammons is a PhD candidate at University of California– Berkeley and the 2018–2019 Advisory Council Fellow at the McNeil Center for Early American Studies. His dissertation chronicles the Yazoo land sales to examine the relationships between borderlands, law, and political economy. American Sanctuary: Mutiny, Martyrdom, and National Identity in the Age of Revolution.ByA. Roger Ekirch.(New York: Pantheon Books, 2017. Pp. 320. Cloth, $30.00.) Reviewed by Terri Diane Halperin In American Sanctuary, A. Roger Ekirch tells the riveting story of mutiny, murder, escape, and retribution in its full detail. He connects the fate of

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: May 21, 2019

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