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Historicizing the Concept of Arab Jews in the Maghrib

Historicizing the Concept of Arab Jews in the Maghrib T H E J E W I S H Q U A R T E R LY R E V I E W , Vol. 98, No. 4 (Fall 2008) 433­451 E M I LY B E N I C H O U G O T T R E I C H T O B EG I N , a few quick observations about the concept of the ``Arab Jew'' that prompt the current intervention: (1), it is largely an identity of ` exile; (2), it implies a particular politics of knowledge vis-a-vis the IsraeliPalestinian conflict and larger Zionist narrative(s); (3), it was originally theorized from within the frameworks of, and remains especially prominent in, specific academic fields, namely, literary and cultural studies.1 While clearly recognizing the significance of the concept of Arab Jews to post-Zionist discourse, not to mention the groundbreaking contributions of those who have revitalized the term in recent years, this essay will nonetheless argue that these three factors have, to varying degrees, converged to keep the discourse about Arab Jews limited to the semanticepistemological level, resulting in a flattened identity that is both historically and geographically ambiguous. Developed in conversation with and presented here http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Jewish Quarterly Review University of Pennsylvania Press

Historicizing the Concept of Arab Jews in the Maghrib

Jewish Quarterly Review , Volume 98 (4) – Nov 15, 2008

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Herbert D. Katz Center for Advanced Judaic Studies
ISSN
1553-0604
Publisher site
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Abstract

T H E J E W I S H Q U A R T E R LY R E V I E W , Vol. 98, No. 4 (Fall 2008) 433­451 E M I LY B E N I C H O U G O T T R E I C H T O B EG I N , a few quick observations about the concept of the ``Arab Jew'' that prompt the current intervention: (1), it is largely an identity of ` exile; (2), it implies a particular politics of knowledge vis-a-vis the IsraeliPalestinian conflict and larger Zionist narrative(s); (3), it was originally theorized from within the frameworks of, and remains especially prominent in, specific academic fields, namely, literary and cultural studies.1 While clearly recognizing the significance of the concept of Arab Jews to post-Zionist discourse, not to mention the groundbreaking contributions of those who have revitalized the term in recent years, this essay will nonetheless argue that these three factors have, to varying degrees, converged to keep the discourse about Arab Jews limited to the semanticepistemological level, resulting in a flattened identity that is both historically and geographically ambiguous. Developed in conversation with and presented here

Journal

Jewish Quarterly ReviewUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Nov 15, 2008

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