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Heading South to Teach: The World of Susan Nye Hutchison, 1815–1845 by Kim Tolley (review)

Heading South to Teach: The World of Susan Nye Hutchison, 1815–1845 by Kim Tolley (review) JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Fall 2017) Connecting the gradual abolitionists of the 1780s with immediate abolitionists of the antebellum era more substantively would have underscored Rael’s endeavor to narrate a history of American emancipation that begins with abolitionism in the American Revolutionary era rather than the typical starting point of the 1830s. It also would have further reinforced the peculiarity of emancipation in the United States when placed on an Atlantic scale. Pa ul J. Pol gar is an assistant professor of history at the University of Mississippi. His publications include “To Raise Them to an Equal Participation: Early National Abolitionism, Gradual Emancipation, and the Promise of African American Citizenship,” Journal of the Early Republic 31 (Summer 2011), 229–58. He is currently at work on a book reinterpreting the origins of American abolitionism. Heading South to Teach: The World of Susan Nye Hutchison, 1815– 1845. By Kim Tolley. (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2015. Pp. 265. Paper, $29.95.) Reviewed by Caroline Hasenyager In Heading South to Teach: The World of Susan Nye Hutchison, 1815– 1845, Kim Tolley recounts the story of a northern teacher’s tumultuous thirty-year residence in antebellum North Carolina and Georgia. Basing her http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Heading South to Teach: The World of Susan Nye Hutchison, 1815–1845 by Kim Tolley (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 37 (3) – Sep 1, 2017

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620
Publisher site
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Abstract

JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Fall 2017) Connecting the gradual abolitionists of the 1780s with immediate abolitionists of the antebellum era more substantively would have underscored Rael’s endeavor to narrate a history of American emancipation that begins with abolitionism in the American Revolutionary era rather than the typical starting point of the 1830s. It also would have further reinforced the peculiarity of emancipation in the United States when placed on an Atlantic scale. Pa ul J. Pol gar is an assistant professor of history at the University of Mississippi. His publications include “To Raise Them to an Equal Participation: Early National Abolitionism, Gradual Emancipation, and the Promise of African American Citizenship,” Journal of the Early Republic 31 (Summer 2011), 229–58. He is currently at work on a book reinterpreting the origins of American abolitionism. Heading South to Teach: The World of Susan Nye Hutchison, 1815– 1845. By Kim Tolley. (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2015. Pp. 265. Paper, $29.95.) Reviewed by Caroline Hasenyager In Heading South to Teach: The World of Susan Nye Hutchison, 1815– 1845, Kim Tolley recounts the story of a northern teacher’s tumultuous thirty-year residence in antebellum North Carolina and Georgia. Basing her

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Sep 1, 2017

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