Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Government by Dissent: Protest, Resistance, and Radical Democratic Thought in the Early American Republic by Robert W. T. Martin (review)

Government by Dissent: Protest, Resistance, and Radical Democratic Thought in the Early American... REVIEWS � 327 Keeps: A History of White College Fraternities (Chapel Hill, NC, 2009) and is finishing a book on the history of minors and marriage in the nineteenth- and twentieth-century United States. Government by Dissent: Protest, Resistance, and Radical Democratic Thought in the Early American Republic. By Robert W. T. Martin. (New York: New York University Press, 2013. Pp. xi  262. Cloth, $49.00.) Reviewed by Matthew Rainbow Hale According to political theorist Robert W. T. Martin, Lockean consent gets all the attention, yet dissent is equally important to democracy. It is important not because dissenters usually obtain what they want, but rather because it ‘‘oblige[s] people to rethink their views’’ (3). Although dissent encompasses the idea of ‘‘the opposition,’’ it is ‘‘more than’’ sim- ple opposition in that it ‘‘need not be, and occasionally is not, unques- tioningly loyal’’ (3). In the end, Martin’s primary goal—one that he, for the most part, achieves—is to chart the late-eighteenth-century emer- gence and contours of theories of dissentient democracy, of political propositions that justify dissent as a necessary, beneficial component of democratic life. Martin’s first chapter argues that rough music (enforcement of com- munal norms through ritualistic intimidation and violence), http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Government by Dissent: Protest, Resistance, and Radical Democratic Thought in the Early American Republic by Robert W. T. Martin (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 35 (2) – Apr 29, 2015

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-pennsylvania-press/government-by-dissent-protest-resistance-and-radical-democratic-v7BAzja3zV
Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620

Abstract

REVIEWS � 327 Keeps: A History of White College Fraternities (Chapel Hill, NC, 2009) and is finishing a book on the history of minors and marriage in the nineteenth- and twentieth-century United States. Government by Dissent: Protest, Resistance, and Radical Democratic Thought in the Early American Republic. By Robert W. T. Martin. (New York: New York University Press, 2013. Pp. xi  262. Cloth, $49.00.) Reviewed by Matthew Rainbow Hale According to political theorist Robert W. T. Martin, Lockean consent gets all the attention, yet dissent is equally important to democracy. It is important not because dissenters usually obtain what they want, but rather because it ‘‘oblige[s] people to rethink their views’’ (3). Although dissent encompasses the idea of ‘‘the opposition,’’ it is ‘‘more than’’ sim- ple opposition in that it ‘‘need not be, and occasionally is not, unques- tioningly loyal’’ (3). In the end, Martin’s primary goal—one that he, for the most part, achieves—is to chart the late-eighteenth-century emer- gence and contours of theories of dissentient democracy, of political propositions that justify dissent as a necessary, beneficial component of democratic life. Martin’s first chapter argues that rough music (enforcement of com- munal norms through ritualistic intimidation and violence),

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Apr 29, 2015

There are no references for this article.