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Going Continental? Romantic Transnationalism and Contemporary Interpretation of the American Revolution

Going Continental? Romantic Transnationalism and Contemporary Interpretation of the American... Going Continental? Romantic Transnationalism and Contemporary Interpretation of the American Revolution BREND A N M CCONVILLE The twenty-first century’s second decade has been defined by conflict between those who would find meaning in nations and national identity and those who believe in a global community or global- ism. The resulting clashes fill our news outlets and shape electoral poli- tics in many societies, including our own. It is a struggle that has permeated many aspects of contemporary life and seems unlikely to end soon. A division that parallels this conflict is evident in the study of the American Revolution. Popular writers, government professors, political scientists, law school instructors, and a few history professors continue to produce scholarship on the Revolution as it has been traditionally understood. These scholars continue to believe that the revolutionary generation’s personalities, events, writings, institutions, and achieve- ments are central to understanding both change in the period and the character of our society today. In this turn, the Revolution is seen as the founding moment of a great, if in some ways greatly flawed, nation whose history offers instruction in fundamental questions even now. Most of these writers in no way identify with the extreme http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Going Continental? Romantic Transnationalism and Contemporary Interpretation of the American Revolution

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 39 (3) – Aug 9, 2019

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620

Abstract

Going Continental? Romantic Transnationalism and Contemporary Interpretation of the American Revolution BREND A N M CCONVILLE The twenty-first century’s second decade has been defined by conflict between those who would find meaning in nations and national identity and those who believe in a global community or global- ism. The resulting clashes fill our news outlets and shape electoral poli- tics in many societies, including our own. It is a struggle that has permeated many aspects of contemporary life and seems unlikely to end soon. A division that parallels this conflict is evident in the study of the American Revolution. Popular writers, government professors, political scientists, law school instructors, and a few history professors continue to produce scholarship on the Revolution as it has been traditionally understood. These scholars continue to believe that the revolutionary generation’s personalities, events, writings, institutions, and achieve- ments are central to understanding both change in the period and the character of our society today. In this turn, the Revolution is seen as the founding moment of a great, if in some ways greatly flawed, nation whose history offers instruction in fundamental questions even now. Most of these writers in no way identify with the extreme

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Aug 9, 2019

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