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God and the Founders: Madison, Washington, and Jefferson (review)

God and the Founders: Madison, Washington, and Jefferson (review) REVIEWS God and the Founders: Madison, Washington, and Jefferson. By Vincent Phillip Munoz. (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2009. Pp. ~ 252. Cloth, $88.99; Paper, $26.99.) Reviewed by Mark Y. Hanley In March 2010, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit affirmed the Constitutionality of the phrase ``under God'' in the Pledge of Allegiance as used in public schools. Writing for the majority in Newdow v. Rio Linda, Judge Carlos Bea cited the noncompulsory nature of the daily recitation, the founders' consensus that ``people derive their most important rights, not from the government, but from God,'' and the symbolic, patriotic purpose of the Pledge. Dissenting Justice Stephen Reinhardt countered that the framers' deliberate omission of references to the deity in the Constitution provided better guidance that called for a radical separation of religion from government activity. The religious motives of advocates who inserted the phrase in 1954, he added, exposed its true character. Consequently, even a noncompulsory daily ritual remained inherently coercive and offensive in an increasingly diverse and secular society. While Bea celebrated ``the proud recitation of some of the ideals upon which our Republic was founded,'' Reinhardt lamented ``the very real Constitutional injury'' done http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

God and the Founders: Madison, Washington, and Jefferson (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 31 (1) – Feb 11, 2011

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
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Copyright © University of Pennsylvania Press
ISSN
1553-0620
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Abstract

REVIEWS God and the Founders: Madison, Washington, and Jefferson. By Vincent Phillip Munoz. (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2009. Pp. ~ 252. Cloth, $88.99; Paper, $26.99.) Reviewed by Mark Y. Hanley In March 2010, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit affirmed the Constitutionality of the phrase ``under God'' in the Pledge of Allegiance as used in public schools. Writing for the majority in Newdow v. Rio Linda, Judge Carlos Bea cited the noncompulsory nature of the daily recitation, the founders' consensus that ``people derive their most important rights, not from the government, but from God,'' and the symbolic, patriotic purpose of the Pledge. Dissenting Justice Stephen Reinhardt countered that the framers' deliberate omission of references to the deity in the Constitution provided better guidance that called for a radical separation of religion from government activity. The religious motives of advocates who inserted the phrase in 1954, he added, exposed its true character. Consequently, even a noncompulsory daily ritual remained inherently coercive and offensive in an increasingly diverse and secular society. While Bea celebrated ``the proud recitation of some of the ideals upon which our Republic was founded,'' Reinhardt lamented ``the very real Constitutional injury'' done

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Feb 11, 2011

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