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From Revolution to Reunion: The Reintegration of the South Carolina Loyalists by Rebecca Brannon (review)

From Revolution to Reunion: The Reintegration of the South Carolina Loyalists by Rebecca Brannon... REVIEWS � 701 supplies, manpower, and money. Does Spain deserve equal credit for America’s success? Ferreiro concludes his book with an ambitious chapter that reads like a new book or at least a pre ´cis for one. This breathless chapter takes readers on a whirlwind tour through the French revolutionary battles and the Napoleonic Wars (and Washington’s election as president) before reaching 1824 when Lafayette toured America. Ferreiro might have pared down his account in order to devote more attention to the significance of Lafayette’s triumphant visit. Within the same chapter, Ferreiro closes his book with a discussion of George Bancroft’s multi- volume history of the United States and its emphasis on the role Ameri- can exceptionalism and self-sufficiency played in the revolutionary vic- tory. Historians hoping for new insights on the globalization of the American Revolution might be disappointed to learn that Bancroft’s work, published between 1834 and 1874, is the only interpretation that Ferrerio engages and challenges. Ferreiro’s thorough and well-written book serves as a reminder of the importance of Britain’s European enemies in America’s fight for indepen- dence. Even if European interests were not American ones, the alliances proved beneficial to America and, to a lesser http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

From Revolution to Reunion: The Reintegration of the South Carolina Loyalists by Rebecca Brannon (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 38 (4) – Dec 3, 2018

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620

Abstract

REVIEWS � 701 supplies, manpower, and money. Does Spain deserve equal credit for America’s success? Ferreiro concludes his book with an ambitious chapter that reads like a new book or at least a pre ´cis for one. This breathless chapter takes readers on a whirlwind tour through the French revolutionary battles and the Napoleonic Wars (and Washington’s election as president) before reaching 1824 when Lafayette toured America. Ferreiro might have pared down his account in order to devote more attention to the significance of Lafayette’s triumphant visit. Within the same chapter, Ferreiro closes his book with a discussion of George Bancroft’s multi- volume history of the United States and its emphasis on the role Ameri- can exceptionalism and self-sufficiency played in the revolutionary vic- tory. Historians hoping for new insights on the globalization of the American Revolution might be disappointed to learn that Bancroft’s work, published between 1834 and 1874, is the only interpretation that Ferrerio engages and challenges. Ferreiro’s thorough and well-written book serves as a reminder of the importance of Britain’s European enemies in America’s fight for indepen- dence. Even if European interests were not American ones, the alliances proved beneficial to America and, to a lesser

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Dec 3, 2018

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