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Founding Sins: How a Group of Antislavery Radicals Fought to Put Christ into the Constitution by Joseph S. Moore (review)

Founding Sins: How a Group of Antislavery Radicals Fought to Put Christ into the Constitution by... REVIEWS relationship. Kane had believed the series of denials from his close friend about the Mormon practice of polygamy, writing letters to President Fillmore defending the Latter-Day Saints. After having the practice confirmed to him in the early 1850s, Kane expressed hurt feelings in his diary. He remained loyal to the Saints, but his tactics shifted. Kane did not abandon his love for Young or his belief that the Mormons suffered persecution, but he refocused his efforts to assisting the Latter-Day Saints in a more private fashion. The Prophet and the Reformer arrives in the midst of a wave of scholarship about Mormonism's role in American history. This Mormon moment has examined anti-Mormonism, Mormonism in the postbellum South, the life of Brigham Young, and many other topics. What this literature, and this edited collection in particular, has done so well is to evaluate the interrelationship between Mormonism and American culture. By recovering the correspondence of Kane and Young, Grow and Walker show that there remain many avenues left to be explored. Na than iel Wie wora is an assistant professor of history at Harding University. He is working on a book about the attitudes of antebellum evangelicals toward http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Founding Sins: How a Group of Antislavery Radicals Fought to Put Christ into the Constitution by Joseph S. Moore (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 37 (2) – May 24, 2017

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620
Publisher site
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Abstract

REVIEWS relationship. Kane had believed the series of denials from his close friend about the Mormon practice of polygamy, writing letters to President Fillmore defending the Latter-Day Saints. After having the practice confirmed to him in the early 1850s, Kane expressed hurt feelings in his diary. He remained loyal to the Saints, but his tactics shifted. Kane did not abandon his love for Young or his belief that the Mormons suffered persecution, but he refocused his efforts to assisting the Latter-Day Saints in a more private fashion. The Prophet and the Reformer arrives in the midst of a wave of scholarship about Mormonism's role in American history. This Mormon moment has examined anti-Mormonism, Mormonism in the postbellum South, the life of Brigham Young, and many other topics. What this literature, and this edited collection in particular, has done so well is to evaluate the interrelationship between Mormonism and American culture. By recovering the correspondence of Kane and Young, Grow and Walker show that there remain many avenues left to be explored. Na than iel Wie wora is an assistant professor of history at Harding University. He is working on a book about the attitudes of antebellum evangelicals toward

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: May 24, 2017

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