Fortune’s Fool: The Life of John Wilkes Booth by Terry Alford (review)

Fortune’s Fool: The Life of John Wilkes Booth by Terry Alford (review) REVIEWS proprietors' offspring were well represented at UNC (and William Mullins being used multiple times as an example downplays its frequency). Interestingly the class position of women--upper-class women received chivalric love and lower-class women were sexual partners-- highlights the absence of lower-class men. Furthermore, the social and potential class differences between the two debating societies are intriguing: The Dialectic Society comprised more western farmers and Whigs, whereas the Philanthropic represented eastern planters and Democrats. In Intellectual Manhood, Timothy J. Williams highlights the inner lives of UNC students and produces a welcome addition to the growing scholarship on antebellum southern manhood. The huge source base creates a lens into young men making the transition from boyhood to manhood and integrating national middle-class culture with southern traditions. Although southern historians may want more context, this intellectual history adds to our understanding of gender and reading in southern education and suggests a wider emerging middle class than is currently accepted. Je nnif er R . Gr een is visiting professor of history at Pacific University. She is author of Military Education and the Emerging Southern Middle Class (New York, 2011), and editor (with Jonathan Daniel Wells) of The Southern Middle Class http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Fortune’s Fool: The Life of John Wilkes Booth by Terry Alford (review)

Journal of the Early Republic, Volume 37 (1) – Feb 23, 2017

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

REVIEWS proprietors' offspring were well represented at UNC (and William Mullins being used multiple times as an example downplays its frequency). Interestingly the class position of women--upper-class women received chivalric love and lower-class women were sexual partners-- highlights the absence of lower-class men. Furthermore, the social and potential class differences between the two debating societies are intriguing: The Dialectic Society comprised more western farmers and Whigs, whereas the Philanthropic represented eastern planters and Democrats. In Intellectual Manhood, Timothy J. Williams highlights the inner lives of UNC students and produces a welcome addition to the growing scholarship on antebellum southern manhood. The huge source base creates a lens into young men making the transition from boyhood to manhood and integrating national middle-class culture with southern traditions. Although southern historians may want more context, this intellectual history adds to our understanding of gender and reading in southern education and suggests a wider emerging middle class than is currently accepted. Je nnif er R . Gr een is visiting professor of history at Pacific University. She is author of Military Education and the Emerging Southern Middle Class (New York, 2011), and editor (with Jonathan Daniel Wells) of The Southern Middle Class

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Feb 23, 2017

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