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Financial Founding Fathers: The Men Who Made America Rich , and: The First Wall Street: Chestnut Street, Philadelphia and the Birth of American Finance , and: One Nation under Debt: Hamilton, Jefferson, and the History of What We Owe (review)

Financial Founding Fathers: The Men Who Made America Rich , and: The First Wall Street: Chestnut... story. In order to explain gaps in the record of Rex's economic connections with customers and suppliers, she offers readers informed conjecture founded upon research in other sources to explain why the account books might be missing crucial information. Wenger ultimately thinks the daybooks show that Rex brokered ``mutually advantageous exchanges of goods'' for his clients that ``enhanced their material lives and helped them reach their economic goals'' (130, 173). She envisions Rex as an enabler who gave rural people hailing from different class locations and ethnic backgrounds an outlet for their productive capacities and consumer dreams. A practitioner of social history, Wenger does not choose to examine the cultural work that bookkeeping ledgers did in the early republic. For the catalogues of exchange that she has profitably mined for evidence of social and economic transformation also fashioned capitalist ``ideology,'' as Michael Zakim has argued. The numbers that Rex entered into his ledgers actually created and constituted the market from his and his neighbors' vantage point. Bookkeeping entries served as abstractions that represented the reality of market interconnectedness, from Schaefferstown to Philadelphia and beyond. While Wenger claims that those figures might be ``an impartial record,'' she also acknowledges http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Financial Founding Fathers: The Men Who Made America Rich , and: The First Wall Street: Chestnut Street, Philadelphia and the Birth of American Finance , and: One Nation under Debt: Hamilton, Jefferson, and the History of What We Owe (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 31 (1) – Feb 11, 2011

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Pennsylvania Press
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1553-0620
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Abstract

story. In order to explain gaps in the record of Rex's economic connections with customers and suppliers, she offers readers informed conjecture founded upon research in other sources to explain why the account books might be missing crucial information. Wenger ultimately thinks the daybooks show that Rex brokered ``mutually advantageous exchanges of goods'' for his clients that ``enhanced their material lives and helped them reach their economic goals'' (130, 173). She envisions Rex as an enabler who gave rural people hailing from different class locations and ethnic backgrounds an outlet for their productive capacities and consumer dreams. A practitioner of social history, Wenger does not choose to examine the cultural work that bookkeeping ledgers did in the early republic. For the catalogues of exchange that she has profitably mined for evidence of social and economic transformation also fashioned capitalist ``ideology,'' as Michael Zakim has argued. The numbers that Rex entered into his ledgers actually created and constituted the market from his and his neighbors' vantage point. Bookkeeping entries served as abstractions that represented the reality of market interconnectedness, from Schaefferstown to Philadelphia and beyond. While Wenger claims that those figures might be ``an impartial record,'' she also acknowledges

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Feb 11, 2011

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