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Fatal Self-Deception: Slaveholding Paternalism in the Old South (review)

Fatal Self-Deception: Slaveholding Paternalism in the Old South (review) in Oneida spiritual and political life. Even as Tiro explores divisions within the Oneidas and the Iroquois as a whole, he makes a powerful argument that the Iroquois behaved rather civilly toward each other during their so-called civil wars of the Revolution and War of 1812. By this he means that the Patriot Oneidas made every effort to avoid engaging Loyalist Iroquois and to warn them when trouble was coming. Tiro also joins a growing chorus of historians who emphasize that Indian removal took place in the North as well as the South and, in the case of New York, under state auspices. Not the least of all, Tiro traces Oneida land loss in compelling detail, including the underhanded methods of New York and United State officials, the Oneidas who sometimes colluded with them, and the many Oneidas who protested them. Thus, though Tiro is reluctant to place his study in historiographical context, his contributions are significant. People of the Standing Stone is the best account of the Oneidas during the long era of the Revolution. This is not a simple story of either loss or persistence or of either victimhood or subaltern agency. People of the Standing http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Fatal Self-Deception: Slaveholding Paternalism in the Old South (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 32 (4) – Oct 22, 2012

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620
Publisher site
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Abstract

in Oneida spiritual and political life. Even as Tiro explores divisions within the Oneidas and the Iroquois as a whole, he makes a powerful argument that the Iroquois behaved rather civilly toward each other during their so-called civil wars of the Revolution and War of 1812. By this he means that the Patriot Oneidas made every effort to avoid engaging Loyalist Iroquois and to warn them when trouble was coming. Tiro also joins a growing chorus of historians who emphasize that Indian removal took place in the North as well as the South and, in the case of New York, under state auspices. Not the least of all, Tiro traces Oneida land loss in compelling detail, including the underhanded methods of New York and United State officials, the Oneidas who sometimes colluded with them, and the many Oneidas who protested them. Thus, though Tiro is reluctant to place his study in historiographical context, his contributions are significant. People of the Standing Stone is the best account of the Oneidas during the long era of the Revolution. This is not a simple story of either loss or persistence or of either victimhood or subaltern agency. People of the Standing

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Oct 22, 2012

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