Family Values in the Old South (review)

Family Values in the Old South (review) REVIEWS drove the political animus toward the Company's monopoly, American competition was certainly a preoccupation within the hearings (239). The American trade barely receives mention within the British historiography. Yet the same cannot be said of the Parliamentary records, which are rife with inquiries into American mercantile practice and prospects. Moreover, Fichter suggests another way American trade shaped British liberalization. A question then as well as now is how much of this ``American'' trade was really American. Fichter answers that ``trade at Calcutta cannot be divided by country so simply'' (184). When Americans had silver stocks to capitalize their own trade, they did. But they also freighted Anglo­Indian goods and traded with British funds. American merchants provided an alternative to the Company for British capital. Investors in the Company are known to have hedged their bets, with stakes in both the Company's monopoly and its demise. In contrast to the cumbersome Company practice of planning out purchases years in advance, lingering in ports for a convoy, and overcharging for independent cargo space (109), American vessels offered a cheaper, quicker, more flexible substitute. And for Americans, profits from the trade concentrated in the hands of capitalists who redeployed the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Family Values in the Old South (review)

Journal of the Early Republic, Volume 31 (2) – Apr 21, 2011

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-pennsylvania-press/family-values-in-the-old-south-review-CJLccFMZ2Q
Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Pennsylvania Press
ISSN
1553-0620
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

REVIEWS drove the political animus toward the Company's monopoly, American competition was certainly a preoccupation within the hearings (239). The American trade barely receives mention within the British historiography. Yet the same cannot be said of the Parliamentary records, which are rife with inquiries into American mercantile practice and prospects. Moreover, Fichter suggests another way American trade shaped British liberalization. A question then as well as now is how much of this ``American'' trade was really American. Fichter answers that ``trade at Calcutta cannot be divided by country so simply'' (184). When Americans had silver stocks to capitalize their own trade, they did. But they also freighted Anglo­Indian goods and traded with British funds. American merchants provided an alternative to the Company for British capital. Investors in the Company are known to have hedged their bets, with stakes in both the Company's monopoly and its demise. In contrast to the cumbersome Company practice of planning out purchases years in advance, lingering in ports for a convoy, and overcharging for independent cargo space (109), American vessels offered a cheaper, quicker, more flexible substitute. And for Americans, profits from the trade concentrated in the hands of capitalists who redeployed the

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Apr 21, 2011

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off