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Establishing Congress: Congress, the Removal to Washington, D.C., and the Election of 1800 (review)

Establishing Congress: Congress, the Removal to Washington, D.C., and the Election of 1800 (review) 478 � JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Fall 2006) Establishing Congress: Congress, the Removal to Washington, D.C., and the Election of 1800. By Kenneth R. Bowling and Donald R. Ken- non, eds. (Athens, OH: Ohio University Press, 2005. Pp. x, 225. Cloth, $44.95.) Establishing Congress is the fourth volume in the History of Congress, 1789-1801 Series, edited by Kenneth R. Bowling of the Documentary History of the First Federal Congress Project, and Donard R. Kennon, chief historian of the United States Capitol Historical Society. The con- tributors include documentary editors, political scientists, and historians, as well as an archivist and a librarian. In the least original essay in the volume, Cal Jillson portrays the presi- dential contest of 1800 as a struggle between two conflicting visions for America. According to Jillson, Republican candidate Thomas Jefferson’s positive view of human nature led him to stand for an agricultural repub- lic of yeoman farmers where government remained democratic and close to the people. Federalist Alexander Hamilton, harboring a more pessi- mistic view of human nature, preferred an urban industrial nation or- dered from above by a strong federal government dominated by an energetic chief executive. John H. Aldrich sees the election http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Establishing Congress: Congress, the Removal to Washington, D.C., and the Election of 1800 (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 26 (3) – Aug 14, 2006

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620

Abstract

478 � JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Fall 2006) Establishing Congress: Congress, the Removal to Washington, D.C., and the Election of 1800. By Kenneth R. Bowling and Donald R. Ken- non, eds. (Athens, OH: Ohio University Press, 2005. Pp. x, 225. Cloth, $44.95.) Establishing Congress is the fourth volume in the History of Congress, 1789-1801 Series, edited by Kenneth R. Bowling of the Documentary History of the First Federal Congress Project, and Donard R. Kennon, chief historian of the United States Capitol Historical Society. The con- tributors include documentary editors, political scientists, and historians, as well as an archivist and a librarian. In the least original essay in the volume, Cal Jillson portrays the presi- dential contest of 1800 as a struggle between two conflicting visions for America. According to Jillson, Republican candidate Thomas Jefferson’s positive view of human nature led him to stand for an agricultural repub- lic of yeoman farmers where government remained democratic and close to the people. Federalist Alexander Hamilton, harboring a more pessi- mistic view of human nature, preferred an urban industrial nation or- dered from above by a strong federal government dominated by an energetic chief executive. John H. Aldrich sees the election

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Aug 14, 2006

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