Empires, Nations, and Families: A History of the North American West, 1800–1860 (review)

Empires, Nations, and Families: A History of the North American West, 1800–1860 (review) REVIEWS governor, that ``there has been hanging enough,'' he otherwise fell silent ´ ´ when both his protege and minister Rufus King peppered him with requests for further advice on the prospect of colonizing accused bondmen in Sierra Leone (87­88). Monroe, by comparison, is depicted as demonstrating ``political sensitivity'' to those who might question mass executions for ``a crisis that had not physically materialized'' (79). Interestingly, Nicholls's characterization of a grieving Monroe, whose son died the night after a captured Gabriel was returned to Richmond, is more sympathetic than that provided by biographer Harlow Unger in his The Last Founding Father: James Monroe and a Nation's Call to Greatness (New York, 2009), who depicts the governor as overly vengeful. Nicholls moves his narrative along at a brisk pace with clear prose that is wonderfully free of jargon. His research, both archival and secondary, is impressive, and as he observes, researching early Virginia from distant Utah is no simple task. Regrettably, his lengthy if oddly combative notes appear only at the end of the text. Do ugla s R. Ege rton is professor of history at Le Moyne College and the 2011­2012 Mary Ball Washington Professor at University College http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Empires, Nations, and Families: A History of the North American West, 1800–1860 (review)

Journal of the Early Republic, Volume 32 (4) – Oct 22, 2012

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620
Publisher site
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Abstract

REVIEWS governor, that ``there has been hanging enough,'' he otherwise fell silent ´ ´ when both his protege and minister Rufus King peppered him with requests for further advice on the prospect of colonizing accused bondmen in Sierra Leone (87­88). Monroe, by comparison, is depicted as demonstrating ``political sensitivity'' to those who might question mass executions for ``a crisis that had not physically materialized'' (79). Interestingly, Nicholls's characterization of a grieving Monroe, whose son died the night after a captured Gabriel was returned to Richmond, is more sympathetic than that provided by biographer Harlow Unger in his The Last Founding Father: James Monroe and a Nation's Call to Greatness (New York, 2009), who depicts the governor as overly vengeful. Nicholls moves his narrative along at a brisk pace with clear prose that is wonderfully free of jargon. His research, both archival and secondary, is impressive, and as he observes, researching early Virginia from distant Utah is no simple task. Regrettably, his lengthy if oddly combative notes appear only at the end of the text. Do ugla s R. Ege rton is professor of history at Le Moyne College and the 2011­2012 Mary Ball Washington Professor at University College

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Oct 22, 2012

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