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Emotional and Sectional Conflict in the Antebellum United States by Michael E. Woods (review)

Emotional and Sectional Conflict in the Antebellum United States by Michael E. Woods (review) JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Spring 2016) Mi chae l D. Rob inso n is an assistant professor of history at the University of Mobile. He is currently completing a manuscript on the crisis of the Union in the Border South. Emotional and Sectional Conflict in the Antebellum United States. By Michael E. Woods. (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2014. Pp. 264. Cloth $90.00.) Reviewed by Erin Austin Dwyer In his extensively researched monograph, Michael E. Woods argues that in the antebellum period emotions were critical to establishing regional identities, forging sectional tensions, and, eventually, mobilizing for civil war. Woods situates his text at the historiographical crossroads of the history of emotions and Civil War history in order to illustrate how emotions were inextricably tied to national politics and sectional identity in the antebellum period, and how diverging feelings were both cause and symptom of a dividing nation. From this intersectional vantage point Woods offers a nuanced critique of revisionist histories of the Civil War, building on their assessment that feelings played a dominant role in the origins of war, while also employing history of emotions theory to establish how emotions are culturally constructed. Woods also counters a http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Emotional and Sectional Conflict in the Antebellum United States by Michael E. Woods (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 36 (1) – Feb 25, 2016

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620
Publisher site
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Abstract

JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Spring 2016) Mi chae l D. Rob inso n is an assistant professor of history at the University of Mobile. He is currently completing a manuscript on the crisis of the Union in the Border South. Emotional and Sectional Conflict in the Antebellum United States. By Michael E. Woods. (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2014. Pp. 264. Cloth $90.00.) Reviewed by Erin Austin Dwyer In his extensively researched monograph, Michael E. Woods argues that in the antebellum period emotions were critical to establishing regional identities, forging sectional tensions, and, eventually, mobilizing for civil war. Woods situates his text at the historiographical crossroads of the history of emotions and Civil War history in order to illustrate how emotions were inextricably tied to national politics and sectional identity in the antebellum period, and how diverging feelings were both cause and symptom of a dividing nation. From this intersectional vantage point Woods offers a nuanced critique of revisionist histories of the Civil War, building on their assessment that feelings played a dominant role in the origins of war, while also employing history of emotions theory to establish how emotions are culturally constructed. Woods also counters a

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Feb 25, 2016

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