Echoes from a Distant Frontier: The Brown Sisters' Correspondence from Antebellum Florida (review)

Echoes from a Distant Frontier: The Brown Sisters' Correspondence from Antebellum Florida (review) BOOK REVIEWS an excellent work of liberating, rehabilitating, and authenticating the historical worth of antebellum African American protest writings that hitherto were subsumed within the genres of slave narratives and protest literatures/traditions. It thus expands tremendously the boundaries of African American historiography. Building on the foundations laid by Carter G. Woodson, Benjamin Brawley, John Hope Franklin, Earl Thorpe, and many others, John Ernest makes a passionate appeal for-- and demonstrates the depth and dynamism of--African American intellectual life and history. This work represents the most extensive intellectual reconstruction of antebellum African American historiography produced in the last two decades. The only blemish, one the author readily admits, is his refusal to critically engage and interrogate the historical nature of antebellum African American historiography. Although he acknowledges ambivalence in this historiography, Ernest's avoidance of what he terms the ``evaluative approach'' (7) and his failure to critique the historical underpinnings of their Afrocentric history are regrettable, given that much of modern-day critique of African American historiography pertains to the enduring influence of the mythic dimensions of antebellum black liberation historiography. TU NDE A D EL E KE is a professor of history at the University of Montana. His most recent http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Echoes from a Distant Frontier: The Brown Sisters' Correspondence from Antebellum Florida (review)

Journal of the Early Republic, Volume 25 (2) – Jun 13, 2005

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

BOOK REVIEWS an excellent work of liberating, rehabilitating, and authenticating the historical worth of antebellum African American protest writings that hitherto were subsumed within the genres of slave narratives and protest literatures/traditions. It thus expands tremendously the boundaries of African American historiography. Building on the foundations laid by Carter G. Woodson, Benjamin Brawley, John Hope Franklin, Earl Thorpe, and many others, John Ernest makes a passionate appeal for-- and demonstrates the depth and dynamism of--African American intellectual life and history. This work represents the most extensive intellectual reconstruction of antebellum African American historiography produced in the last two decades. The only blemish, one the author readily admits, is his refusal to critically engage and interrogate the historical nature of antebellum African American historiography. Although he acknowledges ambivalence in this historiography, Ernest's avoidance of what he terms the ``evaluative approach'' (7) and his failure to critique the historical underpinnings of their Afrocentric history are regrettable, given that much of modern-day critique of African American historiography pertains to the enduring influence of the mythic dimensions of antebellum black liberation historiography. TU NDE A D EL E KE is a professor of history at the University of Montana. His most recent

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Jun 13, 2005

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