Ebony and Ivy: Race, Slavery, and the Troubled History of America’s Universities by Craig Steven Wilder, and: The People’s Martyr: Thomas Wilson Dorr and His 1842 Rhode Island Rebellion by Eric J. Chaput (review)

Ebony and Ivy: Race, Slavery, and the Troubled History of America’s Universities by Craig... to mention the Kentucky-based opposition of Henry Clay, who scored points in skewering Jacksonian Indian-removal policies. The bank war dominating Jackson's second term suggests even more clearly how analysis of the Jackson presidency involved class and economic interest no less than regional ones. The difficulties of treating the Jackson presidency as first and foremost a ``southern'' phenomenon relates to a basic calculus of all national electoral coalitions. Projecting the ``Red State'' configuration of our own day back into the nineteenth century could well have yielded the same minority status for Democrats in 1828 and 1832 as it did for modern-day Republicans in 2008 and 2012. The difference came in the Jacksonians' success in framing a truly national appeal, in which their standard-bearer resonated beyond his ``southern'' and ``heartland'' base. Jackson realized that his elevation to the White House (and his hold on a second term) depended upon his kindling enthusiasm among key constituencies in locales like New York and Pennsylvania. He did this by making aristocratic Whiggery into the country's existential enemy. As such, his party's pursuit of power required a geo-cultural appeal than went beyond that which could be provided by a merely ``southern'' leader. Cheathem's mixed http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Ebony and Ivy: Race, Slavery, and the Troubled History of America’s Universities by Craig Steven Wilder, and: The People’s Martyr: Thomas Wilson Dorr and His 1842 Rhode Island Rebellion by Eric J. Chaput (review)

Journal of the Early Republic, Volume 34 (3) – Aug 12, 2014

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620
Publisher site
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Abstract

to mention the Kentucky-based opposition of Henry Clay, who scored points in skewering Jacksonian Indian-removal policies. The bank war dominating Jackson's second term suggests even more clearly how analysis of the Jackson presidency involved class and economic interest no less than regional ones. The difficulties of treating the Jackson presidency as first and foremost a ``southern'' phenomenon relates to a basic calculus of all national electoral coalitions. Projecting the ``Red State'' configuration of our own day back into the nineteenth century could well have yielded the same minority status for Democrats in 1828 and 1832 as it did for modern-day Republicans in 2008 and 2012. The difference came in the Jacksonians' success in framing a truly national appeal, in which their standard-bearer resonated beyond his ``southern'' and ``heartland'' base. Jackson realized that his elevation to the White House (and his hold on a second term) depended upon his kindling enthusiasm among key constituencies in locales like New York and Pennsylvania. He did this by making aristocratic Whiggery into the country's existential enemy. As such, his party's pursuit of power required a geo-cultural appeal than went beyond that which could be provided by a merely ``southern'' leader. Cheathem's mixed

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Aug 12, 2014

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