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Diplomacy in Black and White: John Adams, Toussaint Louverture, and Their Atlantic World Alliance by Ronald Angelo Johnson (review)

Diplomacy in Black and White: John Adams, Toussaint Louverture, and Their Atlantic World Alliance... JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Winter 2014) in state politics during the 1780s and 1790s, he did very little after 1800 to keep Maryland from slipping gradually toward Republican dominance by the time he died in 1816. Instead, he found contentment within the family circle. From early adulthood, he had shown advanced views on the status of women, believing that ``nature had made them man's equal while society had deprived them of opportunity'' (87). His marriage reflected the transition then occurring from the traditional patriarchal union to the more companionate union of the republican era. McHenry also had relatively advanced racial views, supporting gradual manumission and calling the famous African American Benjamin Banneker ``my black friend'' (147), though he saw no contradiction between these sentiments and the family's ownership of several domestic slaves. Ja mes H . Br ous sard is professor of history at Lebanon Valley College. He is the author of The Southern Federalists, 1800­1816 (Baton Rouge, LA, 1978) and of a forthcoming short biography of Ronald Reagan. Diplomacy in Black and White: John Adams, Toussaint Louverture, and Their Atlantic World Alliance. By Ronald Angelo Johnson. (Athens: The University of Georgia Press, 2014. Pp. 241. Cloth, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Diplomacy in Black and White: John Adams, Toussaint Louverture, and Their Atlantic World Alliance by Ronald Angelo Johnson (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 34 (4) – Nov 24, 2014

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620
Publisher site
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Abstract

JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Winter 2014) in state politics during the 1780s and 1790s, he did very little after 1800 to keep Maryland from slipping gradually toward Republican dominance by the time he died in 1816. Instead, he found contentment within the family circle. From early adulthood, he had shown advanced views on the status of women, believing that ``nature had made them man's equal while society had deprived them of opportunity'' (87). His marriage reflected the transition then occurring from the traditional patriarchal union to the more companionate union of the republican era. McHenry also had relatively advanced racial views, supporting gradual manumission and calling the famous African American Benjamin Banneker ``my black friend'' (147), though he saw no contradiction between these sentiments and the family's ownership of several domestic slaves. Ja mes H . Br ous sard is professor of history at Lebanon Valley College. He is the author of The Southern Federalists, 1800­1816 (Baton Rouge, LA, 1978) and of a forthcoming short biography of Ronald Reagan. Diplomacy in Black and White: John Adams, Toussaint Louverture, and Their Atlantic World Alliance. By Ronald Angelo Johnson. (Athens: The University of Georgia Press, 2014. Pp. 241. Cloth,

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Nov 24, 2014

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