Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Death or Liberty: African Americans and Revolutionary America (review)

Death or Liberty: African Americans and Revolutionary America (review) JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Summer 2011) fellowship, motherhood, and friendship were important defining attributes for elite black womanhood, and they took their job seriously. Erica Armstrong Dunbar's work is a needed and welcome addition to the scholarship of African American women in the colonial and antebellum North. Her look at poor free blacks in antebellum Philadelphia does a great deal to tell the story of the average woman. It is here her work shines since the voice of black domestics and washerwomen is often absent from the historical record. Ri ta Re yno lds , assistant professor of history at Wagner College, is working on a manuscript on wealthy free women of color in antebellum Charleston, South Carolina. Death or Liberty: African Americans and Revolutionary America. By Douglas R. Egerton. (New York: Oxford University Press, 2009. Pp. 281. Cloth, $29.95.) Reviewed by Judith L. Van Buskirk William D. Pierson, the author of Black Yankees (Amherst, MA, 1988), once likened research in eighteenth-century history to fishing. Those studying eighteenth-century African Americans have to fry whatever fish they catch, while those writing about white elites ``may disdain all but the trophy-sized hunkers'' (ix). Indeed, researchers of early African Americans http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Death or Liberty: African Americans and Revolutionary America (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 31 (2) – Apr 21, 2011

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-pennsylvania-press/death-or-liberty-african-americans-and-revolutionary-america-review-wfDPIx97ZT
Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Pennsylvania Press
ISSN
1553-0620
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Summer 2011) fellowship, motherhood, and friendship were important defining attributes for elite black womanhood, and they took their job seriously. Erica Armstrong Dunbar's work is a needed and welcome addition to the scholarship of African American women in the colonial and antebellum North. Her look at poor free blacks in antebellum Philadelphia does a great deal to tell the story of the average woman. It is here her work shines since the voice of black domestics and washerwomen is often absent from the historical record. Ri ta Re yno lds , assistant professor of history at Wagner College, is working on a manuscript on wealthy free women of color in antebellum Charleston, South Carolina. Death or Liberty: African Americans and Revolutionary America. By Douglas R. Egerton. (New York: Oxford University Press, 2009. Pp. 281. Cloth, $29.95.) Reviewed by Judith L. Van Buskirk William D. Pierson, the author of Black Yankees (Amherst, MA, 1988), once likened research in eighteenth-century history to fishing. Those studying eighteenth-century African Americans have to fry whatever fish they catch, while those writing about white elites ``may disdain all but the trophy-sized hunkers'' (ix). Indeed, researchers of early African Americans

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Apr 21, 2011

There are no references for this article.