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Dangerous to Know: Women, Crime, and Notoriety in the Early Republic , and: The Flash Press: Sporting Male Weeklies in 1840s New York (review)

Dangerous to Know: Women, Crime, and Notoriety in the Early Republic , and: The Flash Press:... R EVIEWS EDITED BY ROBERT S. COX AND R AC H E L K . O N U F Dangerous to Know: Women, Crime, and Notoriety in the Early Republic. By Susan Branson. (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2008. Pp. 182. Cloth, $39.95.) The Flash Press: Sporting Male Weeklies in 1840s New York. By Patricia Cline Cohen, Timothy J. Gilfoyle, and Helen Lefkowitz Horowitz. (Chicago: University of Chicago Press in Association with the American Antiquarian Society, 2008. Pp. 278. Cloth, $50.00; Paper, $20.00.) Reviewed by Wendy A. Woloson Americans' insatiable appetite for sex and violence is nothing new. Long before 24-hour cable networks and the Internet, printers and publishers served up the crude, lewd, and criminal. Indian-captivity narratives, truecrime accounts, confessions of the condemned, sex manuals, and bawdy verse have enjoyed a steady audience since at least the Colonial era. Meant for personal and public consumption, they were tacked to tavern walls, sold in plain wrappers from under the bookseller's counter, folded in coat pockets, traded among friends. Two new books contribute to our understanding of the more sordid side of print culture in the first half of the nineteenth century. In Dangerous to Know: Women, Crime, and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Dangerous to Know: Women, Crime, and Notoriety in the Early Republic , and: The Flash Press: Sporting Male Weeklies in 1840s New York (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 29 (3) – Aug 27, 2009

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University of Pennsylvania Press
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Copyright © University of Pennsylvania Press
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Abstract

R EVIEWS EDITED BY ROBERT S. COX AND R AC H E L K . O N U F Dangerous to Know: Women, Crime, and Notoriety in the Early Republic. By Susan Branson. (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2008. Pp. 182. Cloth, $39.95.) The Flash Press: Sporting Male Weeklies in 1840s New York. By Patricia Cline Cohen, Timothy J. Gilfoyle, and Helen Lefkowitz Horowitz. (Chicago: University of Chicago Press in Association with the American Antiquarian Society, 2008. Pp. 278. Cloth, $50.00; Paper, $20.00.) Reviewed by Wendy A. Woloson Americans' insatiable appetite for sex and violence is nothing new. Long before 24-hour cable networks and the Internet, printers and publishers served up the crude, lewd, and criminal. Indian-captivity narratives, truecrime accounts, confessions of the condemned, sex manuals, and bawdy verse have enjoyed a steady audience since at least the Colonial era. Meant for personal and public consumption, they were tacked to tavern walls, sold in plain wrappers from under the bookseller's counter, folded in coat pockets, traded among friends. Two new books contribute to our understanding of the more sordid side of print culture in the first half of the nineteenth century. In Dangerous to Know: Women, Crime, and

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Aug 27, 2009

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