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Damned Nation: Hell in America from the Revolution to Reconstruction by Kathryn Gin Lum (review)

Damned Nation: Hell in America from the Revolution to Reconstruction by Kathryn Gin Lum (review) REVIEWS Overall, Riotous Flesh offers a fresh look at antebellum northern moral reform movements. The book is well structured, and its arguments are presented clearly. Most importantly, Haynes demonstrates that analysis of the debates between white and black activists significantly deepens our understanding of the era’s moral reform movements. Al liso n K. Lan ge is an assistant professor at the Wentworth Institute of Technology. She is currently completing a manuscript on the political use of images in the woman’s rights and woman suffrage movements. Damned Nation: Hell in America from the Revolution to Reconstruction. By Kathryn Gin Lum. (New York: Oxford University Press, 2014. Pp. 310. Cloth, $31.95.) Reviewed by Kyle T. Bulthuis Kathryn Gin Lum’s Damned Nation: Hell in America from the Revolution to Reconstruction is an impressive work that explores antebellum Americans’ persistent belief in hell, and why that belief mattered to both individuals and society. Undergirding this book is a deep consideration of a continuous evangelical community who set the terms of the discourse. Gin Lum follows leading clergy, from Jonathan Edwards to Charles Grandison Finney, and beyond, to explain how among evangelicals the concept of hell was a moving target, refining and adapting http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Damned Nation: Hell in America from the Revolution to Reconstruction by Kathryn Gin Lum (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 37 (3) – Sep 1, 2017

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620
Publisher site
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Abstract

REVIEWS Overall, Riotous Flesh offers a fresh look at antebellum northern moral reform movements. The book is well structured, and its arguments are presented clearly. Most importantly, Haynes demonstrates that analysis of the debates between white and black activists significantly deepens our understanding of the era’s moral reform movements. Al liso n K. Lan ge is an assistant professor at the Wentworth Institute of Technology. She is currently completing a manuscript on the political use of images in the woman’s rights and woman suffrage movements. Damned Nation: Hell in America from the Revolution to Reconstruction. By Kathryn Gin Lum. (New York: Oxford University Press, 2014. Pp. 310. Cloth, $31.95.) Reviewed by Kyle T. Bulthuis Kathryn Gin Lum’s Damned Nation: Hell in America from the Revolution to Reconstruction is an impressive work that explores antebellum Americans’ persistent belief in hell, and why that belief mattered to both individuals and society. Undergirding this book is a deep consideration of a continuous evangelical community who set the terms of the discourse. Gin Lum follows leading clergy, from Jonathan Edwards to Charles Grandison Finney, and beyond, to explain how among evangelicals the concept of hell was a moving target, refining and adapting

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Sep 1, 2017

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