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Culture and Liberty in the Age of the American Revolution (review)

Culture and Liberty in the Age of the American Revolution (review) JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Summer 2012) burgh, where Mary Saracino Zboray is a visiting scholar. They are coauthors of Voices Without Votes: Women and Politics in Antebellum New England (Lebanon, NH, 2010), Everyday Ideas: Socioliterary Experience in Antebellum New England (Knoxville, TN, 2006), and Literary Dollars and Social Sense: A People's History of the Mass Market Book (New York, 2005). Their current project, ``The Bullet in the Book,'' examines cultures of reading during the Civil War. Culture and Liberty in the Age of the American Revolution. By Michal Jan Rozbicki. (Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2011). Pp. 304. Cloth, $35.00.) Reviewed by Sarah Knott Liberty is a social relation and, as such, signifies an asymmetry of social conditions. This is the well-known insight of sociologist and cultural critic Zygmunt Bauman. Armed with an organic and hierarchical view of society, early moderns also knew this. Inequality did not just precede ideas about freedom; it was the very basis of eighteenth-century notions of liberty. The coexistence of inequality and freedom, and the insight that liberty is inherently a privilege that comes at the expense of others, challenges fond modern beliefs in universal human rights. In Culture and Liberty in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Culture and Liberty in the Age of the American Revolution (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 32 (2) – May 5, 2012

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620
Publisher site
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Abstract

JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Summer 2012) burgh, where Mary Saracino Zboray is a visiting scholar. They are coauthors of Voices Without Votes: Women and Politics in Antebellum New England (Lebanon, NH, 2010), Everyday Ideas: Socioliterary Experience in Antebellum New England (Knoxville, TN, 2006), and Literary Dollars and Social Sense: A People's History of the Mass Market Book (New York, 2005). Their current project, ``The Bullet in the Book,'' examines cultures of reading during the Civil War. Culture and Liberty in the Age of the American Revolution. By Michal Jan Rozbicki. (Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2011). Pp. 304. Cloth, $35.00.) Reviewed by Sarah Knott Liberty is a social relation and, as such, signifies an asymmetry of social conditions. This is the well-known insight of sociologist and cultural critic Zygmunt Bauman. Armed with an organic and hierarchical view of society, early moderns also knew this. Inequality did not just precede ideas about freedom; it was the very basis of eighteenth-century notions of liberty. The coexistence of inequality and freedom, and the insight that liberty is inherently a privilege that comes at the expense of others, challenges fond modern beliefs in universal human rights. In Culture and Liberty in

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: May 5, 2012

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