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Creek Paths and Federal Roads: Indians, Settlers, and Slaves and the Making of the American South (review)

Creek Paths and Federal Roads: Indians, Settlers, and Slaves and the Making of the American South... JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Fall 2012) Creek Paths and Federal Roads: Indians, Settlers, and Slaves and the Making of the American South. By Angela Pulley Hudson. (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2010. Pp. 252. Cloth, $65.00.) Reviewed by J. M. Opal This book is a reminder of how a simple change in focus can illuminate a given place and time. Over the past ten years, the Gulf Coast region during the decades around 1800 has attracted new attention, especially by historians of slavery. The making of the ``deep south'' or ``cotton kingdom'' by enslaved black workers and their white masters now claims center stage in larger narratives of western expansion. Hudson's book offers a fresh glimpse of that vast and complex region by focusing on the ways its native inhabitants, especially the Creek Indians, moved through it. In other words, the book makes mobility and territoriality--the ways native peoples and their neighbors traveled through the country and understood their rights to do so--the central topics of inquiry. Who could move through ``Indian country,'' and according to what treaties, customs, or agreements? What did new roads and paths through that territory mean to young braves, opportunist http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Creek Paths and Federal Roads: Indians, Settlers, and Slaves and the Making of the American South (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 32 (3) – Aug 13, 2012

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620
Publisher site
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Abstract

JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Fall 2012) Creek Paths and Federal Roads: Indians, Settlers, and Slaves and the Making of the American South. By Angela Pulley Hudson. (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2010. Pp. 252. Cloth, $65.00.) Reviewed by J. M. Opal This book is a reminder of how a simple change in focus can illuminate a given place and time. Over the past ten years, the Gulf Coast region during the decades around 1800 has attracted new attention, especially by historians of slavery. The making of the ``deep south'' or ``cotton kingdom'' by enslaved black workers and their white masters now claims center stage in larger narratives of western expansion. Hudson's book offers a fresh glimpse of that vast and complex region by focusing on the ways its native inhabitants, especially the Creek Indians, moved through it. In other words, the book makes mobility and territoriality--the ways native peoples and their neighbors traveled through the country and understood their rights to do so--the central topics of inquiry. Who could move through ``Indian country,'' and according to what treaties, customs, or agreements? What did new roads and paths through that territory mean to young braves, opportunist

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Aug 13, 2012

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