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Counterfeit Gentlemen: Manhood and Humor in the Old South , and: Princes of Cotton: Four Diaries of Young Men in the South, 1848–1860 (review)

Counterfeit Gentlemen: Manhood and Humor in the Old South , and: Princes of Cotton: Four Diaries... pauper apprenticeship's operation, making it an essential resource for scholars and students researching the experiences of the poor or unfree labor in early America. The overall effect is a rich, textured patchwork that does leave this reader anxious for more synthesis and explanation. To begin, several authors have offered tantalizing interpretations of change over time. Brewer's essay offers a fascinating interpretation of the impact of revolutionary idealization of a republican family on children's bound labor; she correlates this ideological shift with the relative decline of pauper apprenticeship. In his essay, Whitman convincingly argues that apprenticeship was a ``highly plastic'' labor relationship that was articulated and rearticulated to suit the advance of capitalism (70). These essays are thus suggestive of fruitful areas for future research. Likewise, these two authors, together with Herndon and Murray, highlight the increasing racialization of pauper apprenticeship by the nineteenth century, begging further analysis of what seems to be a crucial process at work that could potentially illuminate changing attitudes toward child labor more generally. In sum, both Children and Youth in a New Nation and Children Bound to Labor are reminders of the importance of analysis of childhood and youth in our reconstruction of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Counterfeit Gentlemen: Manhood and Humor in the Old South , and: Princes of Cotton: Four Diaries of Young Men in the South, 1848–1860 (review)

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
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Copyright © University of Pennsylvania Press
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1553-0620
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Abstract

pauper apprenticeship's operation, making it an essential resource for scholars and students researching the experiences of the poor or unfree labor in early America. The overall effect is a rich, textured patchwork that does leave this reader anxious for more synthesis and explanation. To begin, several authors have offered tantalizing interpretations of change over time. Brewer's essay offers a fascinating interpretation of the impact of revolutionary idealization of a republican family on children's bound labor; she correlates this ideological shift with the relative decline of pauper apprenticeship. In his essay, Whitman convincingly argues that apprenticeship was a ``highly plastic'' labor relationship that was articulated and rearticulated to suit the advance of capitalism (70). These essays are thus suggestive of fruitful areas for future research. Likewise, these two authors, together with Herndon and Murray, highlight the increasing racialization of pauper apprenticeship by the nineteenth century, begging further analysis of what seems to be a crucial process at work that could potentially illuminate changing attitudes toward child labor more generally. In sum, both Children and Youth in a New Nation and Children Bound to Labor are reminders of the importance of analysis of childhood and youth in our reconstruction of

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Nov 26, 2010

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