Common Bondage: Slavery as Metaphor in Revolutionary America (review)

Common Bondage: Slavery as Metaphor in Revolutionary America (review) JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Winter 2012) an educated citizenry, occurred at a time when the fur trade was dwindling and wartime supply functions had ceased, but the grain trade, which helped to knit urban and rural parts of the economy together, was expanding. Carlisle soon became the place where grain was brought to be transported to Philadelphia and Baltimore markets. By 1800, Carlisle had become the fifth largest Pennsylvania town. Although it no longer resembled the coarse colonial village it had once seemed, and economic inequality was increasing, Carlisle retained significant continuities with its past: It still remained a crossroads between regions as well as a contested place. In fact, Carlisle was one of two interior towns where tensions over the whiskey tax surged enough to create major disturbances. The town's protests over whiskey mirrored ``wider struggles over access to economic and cultural privilege in a town where wealth and status gaps were growing'' (194­95). The book's first few chapters are particularly strong. But while the organizing idea of a place in-between works well when the focus is Carlisle's founding, the regional significance of the fur trade, and the effects of war and revolution, it is less http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Common Bondage: Slavery as Metaphor in Revolutionary America (review)

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620
Publisher site
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Abstract

JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Winter 2012) an educated citizenry, occurred at a time when the fur trade was dwindling and wartime supply functions had ceased, but the grain trade, which helped to knit urban and rural parts of the economy together, was expanding. Carlisle soon became the place where grain was brought to be transported to Philadelphia and Baltimore markets. By 1800, Carlisle had become the fifth largest Pennsylvania town. Although it no longer resembled the coarse colonial village it had once seemed, and economic inequality was increasing, Carlisle retained significant continuities with its past: It still remained a crossroads between regions as well as a contested place. In fact, Carlisle was one of two interior towns where tensions over the whiskey tax surged enough to create major disturbances. The town's protests over whiskey mirrored ``wider struggles over access to economic and cultural privilege in a town where wealth and status gaps were growing'' (194­95). The book's first few chapters are particularly strong. But while the organizing idea of a place in-between works well when the focus is Carlisle's founding, the regional significance of the fur trade, and the effects of war and revolution, it is less

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Oct 22, 2012

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