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Clothed in Robes of Sovereignty: The Continental Congress and the People Out of Doors (review)

Clothed in Robes of Sovereignty: The Continental Congress and the People Out of Doors (review) JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Winter 2012) The most disappointing gap in the book is the lack of explicit engagement with the rich historiography on New York's loyalists, in particular Judith Van Buskirk's Generous Enemies: Patriots and Loyalists in Revolutionary New York (Philadelphia, 2002). Van Buskirk argued that the clear lines between loyalist and patriot were often muddied by personal and familial ties in and around the occupied city. Chopra, by contrast, claims that the presence of the army ``locked'' in political allegiance (44). Moreover, because the arguments of Chopra's loyalists were so often theoretical and idealistic, rather than personal or pragmatic, she finds herself restricted to a top-down description of the loyalist community. These criticisms aside, this is a nuanced and thought-provoking study of the painful process some New Yorkers endured in order to stay loyal to the British Empire.3 Se rena Zab in is an associate professor at Carleton College. She is the author of Dangerous Economies: Commerce and Status in Imperial New York (Philadelphia, 2009). Clothed in Robes of Sovereignty: The Continental Congress and the People Out of Doors. By Benjamin H. Irvin. (New York: Oxford University Press, 2011. Pp. 392. Cloth, $34.95). Reviewed by http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Clothed in Robes of Sovereignty: The Continental Congress and the People Out of Doors (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 32 (4) – Oct 22, 2012

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620
Publisher site
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Abstract

JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC (Winter 2012) The most disappointing gap in the book is the lack of explicit engagement with the rich historiography on New York's loyalists, in particular Judith Van Buskirk's Generous Enemies: Patriots and Loyalists in Revolutionary New York (Philadelphia, 2002). Van Buskirk argued that the clear lines between loyalist and patriot were often muddied by personal and familial ties in and around the occupied city. Chopra, by contrast, claims that the presence of the army ``locked'' in political allegiance (44). Moreover, because the arguments of Chopra's loyalists were so often theoretical and idealistic, rather than personal or pragmatic, she finds herself restricted to a top-down description of the loyalist community. These criticisms aside, this is a nuanced and thought-provoking study of the painful process some New Yorkers endured in order to stay loyal to the British Empire.3 Se rena Zab in is an associate professor at Carleton College. She is the author of Dangerous Economies: Commerce and Status in Imperial New York (Philadelphia, 2009). Clothed in Robes of Sovereignty: The Continental Congress and the People Out of Doors. By Benjamin H. Irvin. (New York: Oxford University Press, 2011. Pp. 392. Cloth, $34.95). Reviewed by

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Oct 22, 2012

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