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City Building on the Eastern Frontier: Sorting the New Nineteenth-Century City (review)

City Building on the Eastern Frontier: Sorting the New Nineteenth-Century City (review) REVIEWS But readers familiar with the Pearl story will find large portions of Pacheco's book disappointing. Beyond a few additional details, there is little new in her treatment of slavery in Washington, the escape attempt, the riot, or the sale of the Pearl fugitives. Her discussions of debates in Congress tend toward repetitive summaries of speeches, rather than analysis. She is vague concerning northern abolitionist factionalism and therefore misses the significance of moderate abolitionist Cleveland cooperating in an illegal scheme with radical Chaplin. She pays little attention to the racial tension in Washington between white abolitionists and the African Americans with whom they cooperated. Oddly, in light of considerable recent work on the Underground Railroad, she does not place the Pearl in the context of this intersectional biracial phenomenon. Pacheco's is a worthy effort, but to be successful, future research into the Pearl will have to approach the subject in a more innovative manner. St anle y Ha rro ld is a professor of history at South Carolina State University. His most recent book is The Rise of Aggressive Abolitionism: Addresses to the Slaves (2004). City Building on the Eastern Frontier: Sorting the New NineteenthCentury City. By Diane http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

City Building on the Eastern Frontier: Sorting the New Nineteenth-Century City (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 25 (4)

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620
Publisher site
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Abstract

REVIEWS But readers familiar with the Pearl story will find large portions of Pacheco's book disappointing. Beyond a few additional details, there is little new in her treatment of slavery in Washington, the escape attempt, the riot, or the sale of the Pearl fugitives. Her discussions of debates in Congress tend toward repetitive summaries of speeches, rather than analysis. She is vague concerning northern abolitionist factionalism and therefore misses the significance of moderate abolitionist Cleveland cooperating in an illegal scheme with radical Chaplin. She pays little attention to the racial tension in Washington between white abolitionists and the African Americans with whom they cooperated. Oddly, in light of considerable recent work on the Underground Railroad, she does not place the Pearl in the context of this intersectional biracial phenomenon. Pacheco's is a worthy effort, but to be successful, future research into the Pearl will have to approach the subject in a more innovative manner. St anle y Ha rro ld is a professor of history at South Carolina State University. His most recent book is The Rise of Aggressive Abolitionism: Addresses to the Slaves (2004). City Building on the Eastern Frontier: Sorting the New NineteenthCentury City. By Diane

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

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