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Children and Youth in a New Nation , and: Children Bound to Labor: The Pauper Apprentice System in Early America (review)

Children and Youth in a New Nation , and: Children Bound to Labor: The Pauper Apprentice System... points to a weakness in his explanatory system. Malone attempts to show the dominance of one or another racial ideology by counting votes in constitutional conventions. If a convention votes to exclude black voters, Malone judges racial ascriptivism to be dominant. But this makes his argument a circular one. He argues that black disenfranchisement happened when Conditions A, B, and C were met. How do we know if Condition C was met? According to Malone, we know it was met when black disenfranchisement happened. This circularity saps some of the explanatory power of his argument. Another problem with the overarching argument is that while Malone carefully tells each state's story on its own, he does not take time to compare one state to another in a sustained and detailed fashion. Instead, in chapter 6, the Epilogue, Malone barely mentions the antebellum period and, rather, runs through a brief history of race and politics from the Civil War into the twenty-first century. More explanation of how the antebellum period relates to these later developments and how the cases of New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, and Massachusetts compare to one another would be useful. In sum, however, Malone's close study http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Children and Youth in a New Nation , and: Children Bound to Labor: The Pauper Apprentice System in Early America (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 30 (4) – Nov 26, 2010

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
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Copyright © University of Pennsylvania Press
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1553-0620
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Abstract

points to a weakness in his explanatory system. Malone attempts to show the dominance of one or another racial ideology by counting votes in constitutional conventions. If a convention votes to exclude black voters, Malone judges racial ascriptivism to be dominant. But this makes his argument a circular one. He argues that black disenfranchisement happened when Conditions A, B, and C were met. How do we know if Condition C was met? According to Malone, we know it was met when black disenfranchisement happened. This circularity saps some of the explanatory power of his argument. Another problem with the overarching argument is that while Malone carefully tells each state's story on its own, he does not take time to compare one state to another in a sustained and detailed fashion. Instead, in chapter 6, the Epilogue, Malone barely mentions the antebellum period and, rather, runs through a brief history of race and politics from the Civil War into the twenty-first century. More explanation of how the antebellum period relates to these later developments and how the cases of New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, and Massachusetts compare to one another would be useful. In sum, however, Malone's close study

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Nov 26, 2010

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