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Celtic Mythology: Tales of Gods, Goddesses, and Heroes by Philip Freeman (review)

Celtic Mythology: Tales of Gods, Goddesses, and Heroes by Philip Freeman (review) 294 RevieW s PHILIP FREEMAN. Celtic Mythology: Tales of Gods, Goddesses, and Heroes. New York: Oxford University Press, 2017. Pp. 296. Freeman’s Celtic Mythology is a basic introduction to some of the tales and legends preserved in Irish and Welsh medieval manuscripts. It comprises se - v eral sections, including an introduction, a brief pronunciation guide, a useful glossary for students, some notes on the various chapters, and a shor - t bibliog raphy. The first chapter provides a discussion of classical accounts pertaining to the ancient Celts, their culture, and aspects of their religion (primarily in Gaul and Britain), after which the book begins its presentation of the stories themselves. The promotional materials on the inside jacket of the book make several rather surprising claims. The first—that “shockingly little is known of their [the Celts’] way of life and beliefs, because very few records of their stories exist”—seems to circumvent the existence of an enormous body of medieval Irish and Welsh literature (not to mention written materials from Scotland, Brittany, Cornwall, and the Isle of Man). In addition to numerous classical accounts that discuss Celtic culture and religion, there are other historical accounts and written sources as well, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Magic, Ritual, and Witchcraft University of Pennsylvania Press

Celtic Mythology: Tales of Gods, Goddesses, and Heroes by Philip Freeman (review)

Magic, Ritual, and Witchcraft , Volume 15 (2) – Dec 10, 2020

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
The University of Pennsylvania Press
ISSN
1940-5111

Abstract

294 RevieW s PHILIP FREEMAN. Celtic Mythology: Tales of Gods, Goddesses, and Heroes. New York: Oxford University Press, 2017. Pp. 296. Freeman’s Celtic Mythology is a basic introduction to some of the tales and legends preserved in Irish and Welsh medieval manuscripts. It comprises se - v eral sections, including an introduction, a brief pronunciation guide, a useful glossary for students, some notes on the various chapters, and a shor - t bibliog raphy. The first chapter provides a discussion of classical accounts pertaining to the ancient Celts, their culture, and aspects of their religion (primarily in Gaul and Britain), after which the book begins its presentation of the stories themselves. The promotional materials on the inside jacket of the book make several rather surprising claims. The first—that “shockingly little is known of their [the Celts’] way of life and beliefs, because very few records of their stories exist”—seems to circumvent the existence of an enormous body of medieval Irish and Welsh literature (not to mention written materials from Scotland, Brittany, Cornwall, and the Isle of Man). In addition to numerous classical accounts that discuss Celtic culture and religion, there are other historical accounts and written sources as well,

Journal

Magic, Ritual, and WitchcraftUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Dec 10, 2020

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