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Celebrating the Republic: Presidential Ceremony and Popular Sovereignty, from Washington to Monroe (review)

Celebrating the Republic: Presidential Ceremony and Popular Sovereignty, from Washington to... REVIEWS means to early Kentuckians' goal of global greatness. In the end, the message seems to be that the commitment to slavery and the outcome of the Civil War stymied Kentucky's antebellum rise in cultural and political prominence as it underwent its own Reconstruction. This book is a welcome contribution to the literature on early Kentucky history. Its chronological breadth and topical diversity provide a compromise between the more focused, specialized studies and the standard survey histories of the state. The variety of subjects discussed and the nature of certain chapters to stand on their own produces a disjointed flow at times, but the chapters are brought together nicely in the conclusions. Regardless, the wealth of secondary research within this work provides a fantastic resource for any student of Kentucky and antebellum America. By far the greatest contribution is the authors' connection of the early republic to the state's post-Civil War historical trajectory. Wi llia m A. Sto ne is a PhD candidate at the University of Kentucky. He is currently writing his dissertation on Kentucky politics in the early republic. Celebrating the Republic: Presidential Ceremony and Popular Sovereignty, from Washington to Monroe. By Sandra Moats. (DeKalb: Northern http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Celebrating the Republic: Presidential Ceremony and Popular Sovereignty, from Washington to Monroe (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 32 (4) – Oct 22, 2012

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620
Publisher site
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Abstract

REVIEWS means to early Kentuckians' goal of global greatness. In the end, the message seems to be that the commitment to slavery and the outcome of the Civil War stymied Kentucky's antebellum rise in cultural and political prominence as it underwent its own Reconstruction. This book is a welcome contribution to the literature on early Kentucky history. Its chronological breadth and topical diversity provide a compromise between the more focused, specialized studies and the standard survey histories of the state. The variety of subjects discussed and the nature of certain chapters to stand on their own produces a disjointed flow at times, but the chapters are brought together nicely in the conclusions. Regardless, the wealth of secondary research within this work provides a fantastic resource for any student of Kentucky and antebellum America. By far the greatest contribution is the authors' connection of the early republic to the state's post-Civil War historical trajectory. Wi llia m A. Sto ne is a PhD candidate at the University of Kentucky. He is currently writing his dissertation on Kentucky politics in the early republic. Celebrating the Republic: Presidential Ceremony and Popular Sovereignty, from Washington to Monroe. By Sandra Moats. (DeKalb: Northern

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Oct 22, 2012

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