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Bodies of Belief: Baptist Community in Early America , and: Religion and the Making of Nat Turner's Virginia: Baptist Community and Conflict, 1740–1840 , and: God's Strange Work: William Miller and the End of the World (review)

Bodies of Belief: Baptist Community in Early America , and: Religion and the Making of Nat... Bodies of Belief: Baptist Community in Early America. By Janet Moore Lindman. (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2008. Pp. 272 Pp. Cloth, $39.95.) Religion and the Making of Nat Turner's Virginia: Baptist Community and Conflict, 1740­1840. By Randolph Ferguson Scully. (Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2008. Pp. 303. Cloth, $42.50.) God's Strange Work: William Miller and the End of the World. By David L. Rowe. (Grand Rapids, MI: William B. Eerdmans, 2008. Pp. 249. Paper, $24.00.) Reviewed by David Morgan Baptists exhibit a broad and varied history in colonial North America, ranging from establishing a colony of their own under Roger Williams to their persecution as a tiny minority in the early history of Anglican Virginia. Their history is only more dramatic in the national period, when the once reviled sect became one of the nation's fastest growing Protestant denominations. This was especially true in the South, where Baptists grew from a slender and embattled presence during the early eighteenth century to become the dominant evangelical church in the twentieth. Baptists have been expertly studied by a generation or two of leading scholars, but Janet Moore Lindman and Randolph Ferguson Scully both offer helpful studies. Lindman helps correct http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Bodies of Belief: Baptist Community in Early America , and: Religion and the Making of Nat Turner's Virginia: Baptist Community and Conflict, 1740–1840 , and: God's Strange Work: William Miller and the End of the World (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 29 (3) – Aug 27, 2009

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University of Pennsylvania Press
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Copyright © University of Pennsylvania Press
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1553-0620
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Abstract

Bodies of Belief: Baptist Community in Early America. By Janet Moore Lindman. (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2008. Pp. 272 Pp. Cloth, $39.95.) Religion and the Making of Nat Turner's Virginia: Baptist Community and Conflict, 1740­1840. By Randolph Ferguson Scully. (Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2008. Pp. 303. Cloth, $42.50.) God's Strange Work: William Miller and the End of the World. By David L. Rowe. (Grand Rapids, MI: William B. Eerdmans, 2008. Pp. 249. Paper, $24.00.) Reviewed by David Morgan Baptists exhibit a broad and varied history in colonial North America, ranging from establishing a colony of their own under Roger Williams to their persecution as a tiny minority in the early history of Anglican Virginia. Their history is only more dramatic in the national period, when the once reviled sect became one of the nation's fastest growing Protestant denominations. This was especially true in the South, where Baptists grew from a slender and embattled presence during the early eighteenth century to become the dominant evangelical church in the twentieth. Baptists have been expertly studied by a generation or two of leading scholars, but Janet Moore Lindman and Randolph Ferguson Scully both offer helpful studies. Lindman helps correct

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Aug 27, 2009

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