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Black Women, Eldership, and Communities of Care in the Nineteenth-Century North

Black Women, Eldership, and Communities of Care in the Nineteenth-Century North <p>abstract:</p><p>This essay compares the spiritual and material terms of aging among black women in the post-emancipation North. It contrasts the public representations of African American women elders and the more prosaic, material work that black women and broader northern free black communities performed in coping with the challenges of aging. Early American biographies of black women elders characterized them as pious exemplars of Christian virtue. They also showed how they used collective practices to cope with aging. Other sources reveal this communal ethos. The records of churches, mutual aid societies, black women authors, and others show how free black communities brought together religious and material resources to support African American women in the aging process. Through this "community of care," black Northerners provided material and spiritual support to an aging population of women.</p> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Early American Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal University of Pennsylvania Press

Black Women, Eldership, and Communities of Care in the Nineteenth-Century North

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Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © The McNeil Center for Early American Studies.
ISSN
1559-0895

Abstract

<p>abstract:</p><p>This essay compares the spiritual and material terms of aging among black women in the post-emancipation North. It contrasts the public representations of African American women elders and the more prosaic, material work that black women and broader northern free black communities performed in coping with the challenges of aging. Early American biographies of black women elders characterized them as pious exemplars of Christian virtue. They also showed how they used collective practices to cope with aging. Other sources reveal this communal ethos. The records of churches, mutual aid societies, black women authors, and others show how free black communities brought together religious and material resources to support African American women in the aging process. Through this "community of care," black Northerners provided material and spiritual support to an aging population of women.</p>

Journal

Early American Studies: An Interdisciplinary JournalUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Oct 10, 2019

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