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Between Freedom and Bondage: Race, Party, and Voting Rights in the Antebellum North (review)

Between Freedom and Bondage: Race, Party, and Voting Rights in the Antebellum North (review) REVIEWS Children (Boston, 2007); and coeditor, with Craig Thompson Friend, of Family Values in the Old South (Gainesville, FL, 2010). Her latest book, Topsy-Turvy: How the Civil War Turned the World Upside Down for Southern Children, was published in Fall 2010. Between Freedom and Bondage: Race, Party, and Voting Rights in the Antebellum North. By Christopher Malone. (New York: Routledge, 2008. Pp. 253. Paper, $28.95.) Reviewed by Gabriel Loiacono Christopher Malone has read widely and deeply in the historiography of politics and African Americans in the antebellum Northeast to produce this thoughtful attempt to explain why--or why not--white majorities in northern states moved to disenfranchise African Americans in the period between 1820 and the Civil War. Malone provides a very good synthesis of the secondary sources on race and politics in four states: New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, and Massachusetts. He refrains from mashing these four separate stories together and, more carefully, tells each narrative of black disenfranchisement or enfranchisement one after the other. To tie the four cases together, Malone, a political scientist, offers an overarching argument: that white majorities in northern states disenfranchised black minorities when three conditions were present in the economy, politics, and discourse http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Between Freedom and Bondage: Race, Party, and Voting Rights in the Antebellum North (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 30 (4) – Nov 26, 2010

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University of Pennsylvania Press
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Copyright © University of Pennsylvania Press
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1553-0620
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Abstract

REVIEWS Children (Boston, 2007); and coeditor, with Craig Thompson Friend, of Family Values in the Old South (Gainesville, FL, 2010). Her latest book, Topsy-Turvy: How the Civil War Turned the World Upside Down for Southern Children, was published in Fall 2010. Between Freedom and Bondage: Race, Party, and Voting Rights in the Antebellum North. By Christopher Malone. (New York: Routledge, 2008. Pp. 253. Paper, $28.95.) Reviewed by Gabriel Loiacono Christopher Malone has read widely and deeply in the historiography of politics and African Americans in the antebellum Northeast to produce this thoughtful attempt to explain why--or why not--white majorities in northern states moved to disenfranchise African Americans in the period between 1820 and the Civil War. Malone provides a very good synthesis of the secondary sources on race and politics in four states: New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, and Massachusetts. He refrains from mashing these four separate stories together and, more carefully, tells each narrative of black disenfranchisement or enfranchisement one after the other. To tie the four cases together, Malone, a political scientist, offers an overarching argument: that white majorities in northern states disenfranchised black minorities when three conditions were present in the economy, politics, and discourse

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Nov 26, 2010

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