Between Clinical Writing and Storytelling: Alfonso de Santa Cruz and the Peculiar Case of the Man Who Thought He Was Made of Glass

Between Clinical Writing and Storytelling: Alfonso de Santa Cruz and the Peculiar Case of the Man... abstract: Composed around 1575 and published in 1622, Alfonso de Santa Cruz's Dignotio et cura affectuum melancholicorum was one of the most elaborate clinical texts written on melancholy in early modern Spain. Mostly known for its description of glass delusion, the Dignotio has been typically read either as possible "source material" for Cervantes's El licenciado Vidriera , or as a text whose literary features are, at best, accessory to scientific knowledge. Through a close examination of the framing, texture, and focus of the glass man's story, I complicate the facile identification of the narration as a case history, and showcase the importance of close, narratologically sensitive readings of early modern medical texts. Such readings, I argue, reveal the manifold—and sometimes contradictory—views on madness present in medical writing, and offer a new perspective on the medical–literary dialogue in early modernity, without confining it to mere "influence" or "inspiration." http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Hispanic Review University of Pennsylvania Press

Between Clinical Writing and Storytelling: Alfonso de Santa Cruz and the Peculiar Case of the Man Who Thought He Was Made of Glass

Hispanic Review, Volume 85 (2) – Apr 6, 2017

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-pennsylvania-press/between-clinical-writing-and-storytelling-alfonso-de-santa-cruz-and-Hss9WJPTQi
Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 University of Pennsylvania Press.
ISSN
1553-0639
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

abstract: Composed around 1575 and published in 1622, Alfonso de Santa Cruz's Dignotio et cura affectuum melancholicorum was one of the most elaborate clinical texts written on melancholy in early modern Spain. Mostly known for its description of glass delusion, the Dignotio has been typically read either as possible "source material" for Cervantes's El licenciado Vidriera , or as a text whose literary features are, at best, accessory to scientific knowledge. Through a close examination of the framing, texture, and focus of the glass man's story, I complicate the facile identification of the narration as a case history, and showcase the importance of close, narratologically sensitive readings of early modern medical texts. Such readings, I argue, reveal the manifold—and sometimes contradictory—views on madness present in medical writing, and offer a new perspective on the medical–literary dialogue in early modernity, without confining it to mere "influence" or "inspiration."

Journal

Hispanic ReviewUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Apr 6, 2017

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off