Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Benjamin Franklin’s Intellectual World ed. by Paul E. Kerry and Matthew S. Holland (review)

Benjamin Franklin’s Intellectual World ed. by Paul E. Kerry and Matthew S. Holland (review) REVIEWS pay slightly more than $1.2 million. Thereafter, the Virginia government tried to settle local claims; yet as Butler reveals, this quest for wartime claims would ultimately not be settled until 1903, when federal auditors concluded that after conflicting claims, the state would receive from the federal government only $5.60. The war taught Virginia valuable lessons. The federal government did not defend the lengthy Virginia coastline, which permitted the British to wreak havoc. During the conflict, state leaders argued with the federal government over militia pay, over the amount of federal allocations for the state's defense, as well as the over the federal government's refusal to recognize the strategic need for reinforcement of Fort Powhatan on the James River. That the federal government did not assist Virginia with its war needs, nor provide the troops to defend the state, nor prevent the British from ravaging the state's coastline, only confirmed to Virginians that they had to create their own military force to protect their own territory. Though Butler does not specifically claim such, his rich research vividly describes how the breakdown of its relationship with national officials alienated Virginians, driving them to embrace a states' rights mentality, which http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Early Republic University of Pennsylvania Press

Benjamin Franklin’s Intellectual World ed. by Paul E. Kerry and Matthew S. Holland (review)

Journal of the Early Republic , Volume 34 (1) – Jan 28, 2014

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-pennsylvania-press/benjamin-franklin-s-intellectual-world-ed-by-paul-e-kerry-and-matthew-QBtl81PgPx
Publisher
University of Pennsylvania Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
ISSN
1553-0620
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

REVIEWS pay slightly more than $1.2 million. Thereafter, the Virginia government tried to settle local claims; yet as Butler reveals, this quest for wartime claims would ultimately not be settled until 1903, when federal auditors concluded that after conflicting claims, the state would receive from the federal government only $5.60. The war taught Virginia valuable lessons. The federal government did not defend the lengthy Virginia coastline, which permitted the British to wreak havoc. During the conflict, state leaders argued with the federal government over militia pay, over the amount of federal allocations for the state's defense, as well as the over the federal government's refusal to recognize the strategic need for reinforcement of Fort Powhatan on the James River. That the federal government did not assist Virginia with its war needs, nor provide the troops to defend the state, nor prevent the British from ravaging the state's coastline, only confirmed to Virginians that they had to create their own military force to protect their own territory. Though Butler does not specifically claim such, his rich research vividly describes how the breakdown of its relationship with national officials alienated Virginians, driving them to embrace a states' rights mentality, which

Journal

Journal of the Early RepublicUniversity of Pennsylvania Press

Published: Jan 28, 2014

There are no references for this article.